All posts by Editor-in-Chief

Deborah Levine is Editor in-Chief of the American Diversity Report. She is an award-winning author of 14 books, received the Champion of Diversity Award from diversitybusiness.com, the Excellence Award from the Tennessee Economic Council on Women and is featured on C-Span/ BookTV. Her published articles span decades in journals & magazines: The American Journal of Community Psychology, Journal of Public Management & Social Policy, The Bermudian Magazine, The Harvard Divinity School Bulletin. A former blogger with The Huffington Post, she is now an opinion columnist with The Chattanooga Times Free Press.

Why Thanksgiving Matters – by Lisa M. Scuderi-Burkimsher

I’d be lying if I said I didn’t enjoy the abundant amount of food we eat on Thanksgiving. In fact, I look forward to it every year. It’s one of my favorite holidays. But it’s more than just the food.

There are two reasons why Thanksgiving matters to me. The first reason begins when I was a child, we spent every Thanksgiving at my grandparents house in Brooklyn. My Sicilian grandmother barely spoke English and my grandfather had always been a quiet man; however, once the whole family with cousins, Aunts and Uncles were in the room, it had been a festive event of chortling and great food in a tiny apartment with one bathroom and approximately twenty-five of us. 

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Diversity and Speech Part 7: Critical Theory – by Carlos E. Cortés    

Carlos Cortez
Carlos Cortez

This is the seventh in a series of columns based on my research as a former fellow of the University of California National Center for Free Speech and Civic Engagement.   In these columns I have discussed what I call the diversity movement — the composite of the myriad individual, group, and organizational efforts to reduce societal inequities that penalize people because of their actual or perceived membership in certain social groups.   In particular I have focused on the various issues raised  concerning language and the exercise of speech. 

In the past two columns I compared two threads of that diversity movement: intercultural diversity and equity-and-inclusion diversity.   For the most part interculturalists emphasize voluntary speech restraint through the development of intergroup understanding.  In contrast, while they often draw upon interculturalist principles, some inclusionists are more willing to pursue direct speech restraints, such as through regulations.  When it comes to the third strand of the diversity movement, critical theory, its advocates tend to take an even stronger position in support of  the direct restraint of speech, including through laws and codes.   

Continue reading Diversity and Speech Part 7: Critical Theory – by Carlos E. Cortés    

Living and Dying – by Deborah Levine

When an anniversary falls on Yom Kippur, the most solemn holy day of the Jewish calendar, thoughts of living and dying take on cosmic proportions.  Fortunately, it’s rare for the two milestones to collide given the differences between the secular and Jewish calendars. Both are celebrations, but Yom Kippur which ends the New Year’s ten Days of Awe, is a sacred time when the celebration of life is combined with contemplation its finite nature. This year, I have a double dose of introspection and my mind sought the path separating living from dying and wandered from wonder and gratitude to mourning and humility.

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All is not lost – by Deborah Levine

Originally published in The Chattanooga Times Free Press

In a month where there seems no end to disasters, scandals, and threats, I celebrated my birthday looking for a ray of hope. Can a whiff of integrity emerge from a whistle blower’s urgent concerns that apparently link our president, the Ukraine, and extortion? Will our faith in leadership mean that floods and fires aren’t our nation’s future.  Maybe, we’ll even have the courage to control mass shootings. Alternating between holding my breath and large noisy sighs, my hubby and I went off to the movies for a bit of escapism. Who knew that the ray of hope would show up with the popcorn.

Continue reading All is not lost – by Deborah Levine

Policies, Faith, and Calendars – by Deborah Levine

When the Jewish New Year arrived, I got many questions about faith and calendars from Human Resource departments. They wanted to know why the holiday occurs on a different day each year according to our secular calendar. And they asked about food associated with the holiday. Offering the traditional apples and honey for a sweet New Year was the easy part. Explaining the timing was the real challenge.

What should I write about religion and religious calendars in these contentious times? I know that many organizations and companies would prefer that the issue of religious diversity would disappear. But every year, thousands of religion-based lawsuits claiming a “hostile or offensive work environment” are registered with the EEOC (Equal Employment Opportunity Commission).

Continue reading Policies, Faith, and Calendars – by Deborah Levine

It’s the Environment, Stupid – by Deborah Levine

Originally published as an opinion column in The Chattanooga Times Free Press

The GOP is determined not to be upended by Sharpie Gate.  Presidential primaries in several states have disappeared and the party wants us to know “…The contrast between Mr. Trump and the Democratic field is a demonstration of just how much Mr. Trump understands the American psyche and just how much most Democrats do not.” They know that in this week’s contest for weird news, “Sharpie Gate” might outdo the Taliban-Camp David story, the firing/resignation of John Bolton, the U.S. military’s spending related to Trump’s Ireland golf course, and maybe all the other 12,019 false or misleading presidential statements documented by Fact Checker.

How did this mess escalate so quickly? We began with a silly photo-op when Trump, trying to prove his earlier claim that Dorian put Alabama at risk, produced a map showing the hurricane moving in a sharpie-drawn curve towards Alabama. We progressed to goofy when Twitter erupted with sharpie memes: Trump with 6-pack abs, bone spur feet, and, my favorite, a check from Mexico for ten trillion dollars for the wall.

Continue reading It’s the Environment, Stupid – by Deborah Levine

Trends and Challenges: Systemic Diversity Panel

What’s Next for Inclusion?

Systemic Diversity Panels share ideas, articles, research and resources that reinforce our quest for diversity, inclusion, equity and social justice. The Systemic Diversity and Inclusion Linked group allow participants to share their work and encourage them to do so in a manner that is consistent with the group’s vision for peace, equity and social justice for all.

This group is committed to sharing ideas on effective policies and practices to eradicate misconceptions and biases in diverse workplaces, and thus promote positive work environments for all people. We also profile members and their work that aligns with our  vision. See interviews at Systemic Diversity and inclusion Group.

Deborah LevineDeborah Levine (Moderator)

Award-winning Author (14 books), including Un-Bias Guide for Leaders and Religious Diversity at Work | Speaker/Trainer & Coach | Founder/Editor: American Diversity Report |
Chattanooga, Tennessee, USA (See her Bio)

Joseph NwoyeJoseph Nwoye, Ed.D (Partner)

Diversity & Inclusion Consultant with Unique Ability to Address Unconscious Bias, Inclusive Leadership @ Work & Beyond | Author of three books, including the most recent, Cultivating a Belief System for All (See his latest interview)
Montgomery Village, Maryland, USA

Colonel ReginaldColonel Reginald Hairston

Proven Senior Level Leader | Multiple Years Experience Setting Strategic Direction and Managing Change | Innovator | Author of Simple Man’s Leadership Guide
Chesapeake, Virginia, USA

AtenaAtena Hensch

Inclusive Diversity and belonging Specialist | Unconscious Bias | Gender | Cultural Intelligence | Certified Trainer
Geneva Area, Switzerland

 

LouiseLouise Duffield

VP @GatedTalent | SEO | Executive Search | Social Media | Branding | LinkedIn Optimization | LinkedIn Profile Writer
United Kingdom

Aid in Peril and So are We – by Deborah Levine

Originally published in The Chattanooga Times Free Press

When President Trump threatened to cut off $4 billion in foreign aid, the U.S. Global Leadership Coalition emailed how cuts could limit the response to outbreaks of the deadly ebola virus. Concerned, I immediately thought of John Germ, past president of Rotary International, who spoke at Glynn Hodges’ recent Mastermind meeting. Yes, we were inspired by his story of being the first in his family to graduate college. And we were speechless at his stories of navigating outdated military planes on the verge of crashing. We empathized with his struggles to finish college while marrying and having his first child. But it was his dedication to eradicating polio world-wide, his ability to see the challenge as an invitation, that held us in awe.   

Continue reading Aid in Peril and So are We – by Deborah Levine

Gun debacle and debate, again – by Deborah Levine

Originally published in The Chattanooga Times Free Press

We all know that after the back-to-back mass shootings this weekend, there will be renewed discussion over gun control and safety. We also know that the debate will probably go nowhere, as usual. Even though many of these massacres are committed using military style weapons, many anti-gun control folks maintain that owning these semi-automatic rifles is a  constitutional right.  Why should law abiding persons be limited because of a few crazies out there.  But given that CBS news reports more mass killings in 2019 than days so far this year. It’s time to re-examine our cultural norms regarding military-style weapons.   

Continue reading Gun debacle and debate, again – by Deborah Levine

ADR Short Story Contest

Writing Project for Schools & Students

Short Story = A brief exploration of a subject in prose expressing a personal view or interpretation of a subject or topic.

Schools may submit students’ short stories online to the foundation before or by March 1, 2020. Students should be 12-18 yrs. old.

Student Requirements:

  1. Only one short story written per contestant should be submitted on or before March 1, 2020.
  2. Submissions must be made to the school’s designated judge.  
  3. The top of each page must include the contestant’s name, page number, and story title.
  4. The Short Story should have a single storyline, no subplots, no more than three or four characters and a short time scale.
  5. The story must be double spaced and between 1000 and 1500 words.

School Requirements:

Schools serving students ages 12-18 may register to participate using the form below during the Fall 2019 semester.

  1. Each school must provide a contact person and their e-mail.
  2. The 1st place winner’s short story must be written in English or be translated into English in order to be published in the American Diversity Report
  3. The 1st place winner’s story must be submitted online by May 1, 2020. Directions will be provided to the contact person.
  4. The names of the 2nd and 3rd place winners and the titles of their stories will also be mentioned in the American Diversity Report.
  5. A minimum of one judge per school is required. The judge may be a teacher, administrator, or published author in the community.
  6. We suggest that our Short Story Writing Guide be used to assist students in their writing.

Scroll down for  Short Story Writing Guide
Download

Judges Criteria

Judges will use the following criteria and report the  students with the highest totals of points (1st, 2nd, and 3rd place) by May 1, 2020.

General Merit (25 pts)

  1. Ideas (single storyline, no subplots, 3-4 characters, short time scale)
  2. Organization (consistent writing style, consistent mood, tone and space)
  3. Wording (appropriate language, brief descriptions)
  4. Flavor/Engaging

Mechanics (25 pts)

  1. Word usage
  2. Punctuation/Capitalization
  3. Spelling

Overall Effect (50 pts)

  1. Minimum background
  2. concise dialogue
  3. no lengthy preamble
  4. no contrived ending

WINNERS:

Judges report 1st, 2nd, & 3rd place winners
Awards courtesy of English with Mary Moore LLC

1ST PLACE- TROPHY AWARD
Story published in the American Diversity Report

2nd and 3rd PLACE = Certificate Awards
Names & story titles mentioned in the American Diversity Report

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**SHORT STORY WRITING GUIDE – SPECIAL DISCOUNT – ONLY $3.50 usd – get DOWNLOAD


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