All posts by Editor-in-Chief

Deborah Levine is Editor in-Chief of the American Diversity Report. She is an award-winning author of 14 books, received the Champion of Diversity Award from diversitybusiness.com, the Excellence Award from the Tennessee Economic Council on Women and is featured on C-Span/ BookTV. Her published articles span decades in journals & magazines: The American Journal of Community Psychology, Journal of Public Management & Social Policy, The Bermudian Magazine, The Harvard Divinity School Bulletin. A former blogger with The Huffington Post, she is now an opinion columnist with The Chattanooga Times Free Press.

The Art of Perseverance & Endurance

Deborah LevineHear Deborah Levine’s interview with Rabbi Tzvi and learn about the art of perseverance and endurance. She shares her personal stories that are captured in her memoir, The Magic Marble Tree.  In this interview Deborah talks about her journey through pain and incapacitation and why she decided to  write the book.

Click below to hear true stories that will inspire you to Never Give Up!

ADR Submission GUIDE

YOUR SUBMISSION INFO

Submission to the American Diversity Report is encouraged and the guidelines make it easy for writers to participate . Created in 2006 as a local-global writers colony, the ADR is a creative resource for understanding cultural diversity. See below for the topics that we feature. The submission deadline is at noon on the 15th of each month The next deadline is on the 15th of September.  There is a summer hiatus when your submission will be held for that issue.)

1. ADR SUBMISSION DIRECTIONS

Please submit your article as a word.doc attachment and e-mail to: info@diversityreport.com  New articles are announced in the monthly issues of our e-newsletter.  Authors are added to our e-newsletter mailing list and receive notification of publication through the e-newsletter. (Note: Poems should be submitted directly to Poetry Editor John C. Mannone: jcmannone@gmail.com )

2.  ADR FORMAT GUIDE

  • FONT: Times Roman – size 12
  • LANGUAGE:  Articles must be submitted in American or British English.
  • PARAGRAPHS:  Don’t indent paragraphs – space them instead.  The first 5 lines of your 1st paragraph are most visible – so make them memorable.  Don’t waste space by quoting someone else.
  • WORD COUNT:  600-1,500 words.
  • TITLE:  Do not use ALL CAPS, Symbols or Quotation marks.
  • SUBTITLES: Include a minimum of 3 sub-titles.
  • QUOTES: Do not begin your article by quoting someone else.
  • BIO: Include a short profile at the bottom of your article: 50-100 words. Do not include live links in your bio for security reasons.
  • PHOTO/GRAPHIC: You may submit a visual as a jpg attachment in your e-mail submission. indicate the owner/author of visuals – you must have permission for its use.
  • URL LINKS: You may include links to websites in the article, but not e-mail addresses.
  • Read our Disclaimer – You retain copyrights.

C.  ADR TOPICS

Preference will be given to articles that engage the key themes of the ADR. Click to see examples:

E. RULES: SUBMISSION NOT PUBLISHED

  • NO profanity or hate speech
  • NO press releases, infomercials, funding requests, sales / give aways of products or services
  • NO political endorsements
  • NO anonymous submissions
  • NO time sensitive or event announcements

ADR PODCASTS

The ADR podcasts welcome movers & shakers and diverse change makers.. Use our INTERVIEW FORM to apply to be interviewed.
NOTE:  ADR rules apply to interviews

Talk Show Field Day – by Deborah Levine

(originally published in The Chattanooga Times Free Press)

Talk Show Field DayThe latest thing in political discourse is a doozie. The liberal “Squad” has become the hate target of the week, revving up the President’s campaign rally in Florida. Charges of racism are flying all over the place after the “Send her back” chant. Thirteen seconds went by as the President sat back and took it all in. While push back was furious with much “racist” name calling applied to Trump. He disavowed those chants the next day and claimed he’d immediately started to talk fast to silence the unruly crowd. Talk show hosts had a field day with that one. The Daily Show’s Trevor Noah inserted a video of Olympic track star Usain Bolt winning a medal in the same time it took before Trump spoke.

Trump basked in the congratulations of a right-wing British commentator known for hateful anti-Muslims and anti-Semitic remarks. But I doubt anyone in the UK or the US was surprised when Trump immediately turned around and ranted about the Squad’s anti-Semitism and racism. Our political warming is producing unprecedented heat waves, stoked by increasingly divisive leadership.

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Nurturing and Humility in Leadership – by Deborah Levine

I have been puzzled by colleagues congratulating me on my humility. What are these folks talking about? People who knew me years ago would definitely be amused by that. At best, I was described as “Sweet but Stern.” At my boldest, I was told that I could terrorize entire cities. Community leaders had a white-knuckled grasp on their chairs when I tersely announce my intention to speak off-the-record. Not even a voice from the back of the room calling out, “Oh ho, this should be good!” slowed me down.

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The Challenge of Unconscious Bias – by Deborah Levine

Unconscious bias training is an admirable project but may often be ineffective. The fuzzy, vague term of unconscious bias is often applied indiscriminately, but unconscious bias isn’t a one-size-fits-all term amenable to a one afternoon of training. Yes, it can refer to the incident where the police were called to arrest two African-Americans waiting for a meeting at Starbucks. But it can also mean only smiling at customers that look like you, rejecting resumes from diverse applicants, and promoting the employees who resemble the current leadership team. If we want to address unconscious bias effectively, we need to first be aware of how the senses, emotions, and brain interact to create unconscious bias. Second, we must go beyond awareness of our biases to sensitivity to their impact. Lastly, we need to develop a system that internalizes wise decision making with ongoing reinforcement of that competence.

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Music and Neuro Communication: Part 2 – by Deborah Levine

Neuro Communication with James Brown

The musical neuro communication with Ravi Shankar ended with his deep bow. The burst of applause was startling after the stillness, as was the quick dash of movement to the bathrooms. I turned to Cousin Sam, thanked him, and started to put on my coat. Sam didn’t move, ”We should stay for the next act.” I whined at that, “I’m tired and it’s a long schlep back to campus on the bus.” “Trust me. We should stay,” he said softly, but firmly. And so, mildly kvetching (complaining in Yiddish), I was still seated when the curtain re-opened.

Continue reading Music and Neuro Communication: Part 2 – by Deborah Levine

Music and Neuro Communication: Part 1 – by Deborah Levine

Neuro Communication with Ravi Shankar

My cousin Sam and I escaped our Harvard dorms and were about to experience neuro communication as we headed out to a Ravi Shankar concert in a small neighborhood theater in Boston. I was just seventeen, you know what I mean, and it was frostbite territory standing at the bus stop in Cambridge, Mass. Freezing almost took my mind off of being homesick for my family back in New York. Overcome with loneliness, I needed an attitude adjustment and Sam insisted on some music therapy. He thought that classical sitar music from India would distract and soothe  – reboot my brain.  I wondered why we were the only Harvard students who ‘d come to hear this relatively unknown musician from India. But it was the sixties and Shankar hadn’t yet been labeled by The Beatles’ George Harrison as “the godfather of world music”.

Continue reading Music and Neuro Communication: Part 1 – by Deborah Levine

The Powerful Connection of Spirituality and Entrepreneurship– by Deborah Levine

Let us be aware that creating your own business requires a connection between spirituality and entrepreneurship.  How does that work? The first element is the business side of the endeavor and its bottom line, otherwise known as ‘show me the money.’  The second motivation is self-fulfillment.  Some refer to this element of entrepreneurship as ‘personal satisfaction.’  But the core of the vague term ‘personal satisfaction’ is what is best described as a spiritual sense of purpose.  This spirituality is sometimes linked to one’s particular faith tradition, but is not necessarily so.  Rather, there is a commonality in this spiritual sense of something greater than ourselves that translates across the boundaries of specific religions.  Most importantly, there is tremendous power where this spirituality and business overlap.

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Dr. Joseph Nwoye: Diversity Frontier Podcast

NwoyeDr. Nwoye is an educator and inclusion specialist. As the president of Diversity Frontier, he focuses on unconscious bias and diversity policies & practices that work.  Dr. Nwoye has contributed more than 50 articles with focus on tackling social issues such as achievement gaps, race, and gender among others. He served as the Director of Multicultural Education at Illinois State University and as chief investigator on discriminatory issues. Dr.Nwoye is the author of three books. His most recent one which is the focus of this podcast. (Click for Amazon) Cultivating a Belief System for Peace, Equity and Social Justice For All.

CLICK below to hear Dr. Nwoye’s podcast about his new book…

Diversify into the Future – by Deborah Levine

Originally published in The Chattanooga Times Free Press

“As we gather together at this exploration & celebration of our cultural diversity, let us ask for the blessing of our Creator who has placed us all on this precious planet. Let us give thanks for our shared hope for a future where we can harmonize, not homogenize, the intersection of race, ethnicity, religion, generation, and genders represented in this room.” That’s how I began my invocation prayer for Chattanooga’s Chamber of Commerce Diversify Summit. The luncheon at the Convention Center was packed with every generation, from grey-haired sages to newborn infants with their moms. Attendees represented corporations, small businesses, universities and colleges, nonprofits, networking groups, media, and municipal agencies.

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