All posts by R.A. Crevoshay

R. A. Crevoshay is an American-born Ashkenazic Jew. She is a California-based consulting Horticulturist and an advocate for Organic Farming and Food. In 2018, at the age of 69, she resolved to embrace her authentic female self and live her life as a woman.

Transgender Jews: Intersectional Study Part 2 – by R. A. Crevoshay

As my 65th birthday approached my transgender personality had become desperate and demanded attention. Decades of self-deception did not bury my feminine self. She had in fact grown, despite isolation, neglect, and denial. I discovered a private dressing room, a place to give her a chance to breathe. I sought the aid of a therapist. Though I believed that I already had the answer, I asked whether I was, in her professional opinion, truly a transgender person. A dozen sessions later she affirmed my suspicion. Indeed I was transgender.

For decades my family had attended an orthodox synagogue. It was an exercise in cognitive dissonance for my hidden identity. Leviticus was at best conflicted about gender. I saw no possibility for reconciliation for Transgender vs. Judaism. Shortly after my therapist confirmed my identity, I heard breaking  transgender news that stole my attention.

Continue reading Transgender Jews: Intersectional Study Part 2 – by R. A. Crevoshay

Transgender Jews: An Intersectional Study Part 1 – by R. A. Crevoshay

At the tender age of 70, I have come out to the world as a transgender woman. Plagued by intractable anxiety and preoccupied with all things feminine I was surprised by the inescapable  intersectionality conferred upon me involuntarily – that not only am I transgender, but I am a transgender Jew.

Judaism always seemed the right fit for me. Its implicit refutation of our dominant theology appealed to me. Personified by modern folk heroes like Einstein, Dylan (Zimmerman), and Koufax, it seduced me with inspiration. With teleological certitude Jewish Messianism offers the promise of a just revolution in our time and a profound endorsement of the counter-cultural impulse. It encouraged our rage against Nazis. It made us as one with all of America’s rejected minorities from the original Native Americans to the most recently-arrived Syrian refugees.

I embrace this rare classification with enthusiasm. I’ve discovered that transgender Jewry features an elite element that could not possibly include me. Or could it?

Continue reading Transgender Jews: An Intersectional Study Part 1 – by R. A. Crevoshay