Category Archives: Authors R-Z

ADR authors listed by last name R-Z

The Business Case for Gender Diversity — by Caroline Turner

Most people don’t change, or willingly go along with change, because the change is “the right thing to do.” They do it if there is an important reason to change. Businesses don’t change their corporate cultures so that they retain women because doing so is nice for women. They do it if there is a compelling business reason to do so. The bottom line reasons to achieve gender diversity in leadership are exactly that—compelling.

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WHY Women Leave Their Jobs at a Higher Rate than Men — by Caroline Turner

Women leave their jobs at a higher rate than men. This is confirmed by data from the Bureau of Labor and by private research. There are three reasons business leaders need to understand why women leave. All are reasons to engage women so they’ll stay:
1. Turnover has a significant cost—estimates range between 50 and 200% of annual salary (plus negative impact on morale and performance).
2. Fully half of the total workforce and of the hiring pool (more than half of the educated hiring pool) is female—so the group at greatest risk of leaving is large.
3. Gender diversity in leadership has been correlated with higher returns (see studies by Catalyst and McKinsey); if you are losing women, you are probably losing the upside of gender diversity.

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But, don’t you forgive me? Why the golden rule may not repair trust across cultures — by Dr. Jessica Wildman

The globalization of organizations is an undeniably reality. Businesses and governments are working together to solve problems too big and too complex for any one country. Unfortunately, a quick glance through the recent news headlines points to a critical roadblock in the path to successful international collaboration: a severe lack of trust across organizational and national borders. Trust is one of the basic building blocks of successful collaboration.

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Vigilia — Poem by Sheika A.

Drape me in the purdahs of your being
as I cave into hundred thousand deaths
per night; relentlessly I lodge my spirit
in the empty taverns of your existence
wishing to grow a flower, not very red
like shimmering rubies found in Mahals
of kings richly adorned of any despair,
but a plant common that you colour,
I hope, with the red of your blood warm.
Like a nomad groping towards an oasis,
I had disciplined myself to survive you
through these very nights, manifesting
sanity to stubborn senility; from lover
to patient, to broken as is what became
of a once curated heart.

Where have all the Africans gone? – by Yvor Stoakley

We all have stereotypical images of countries and their populations. We develop these images from our education in schools and universities, from our travels, from our news and sports media, from our literature, increasingly from the internet, and from visual media including film and television.  How accurate are these images? How do they change over time? How are they “colored” by our own conditioning and culture?

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What My Father Taught Me About Diversity and Inclusion — by Mauricio Velásquez

Antonio Velásquez, my immigrant father, who came to this country (legally , you have to say that these days) with nothing, not knowing the language, serving this great country in the military and then eventually, with the GI bill, graduating from college (at age 32) recently passed away.  My father lived to see me go to college and graduate, earning a BA and MBA from two great schools, and watched me marry a fabulous woman and have three wonderful children together and start my own firm – The Diversity Training Group.  DTG has thrived for nearly 15 years.

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Why Diversity Fatigue — by Mauricio Velásquez

I think many people are tired of the diversity issues percolating and re-circulating in the workplace, marketplace, and society-at-large, but way too many people just don’t realize that these diversity and inclusion issues are going unacknowledged, unresolved and “will come back over and over again.”  The question is not should we fear diversity fatigue but why are so many people so fatigued?

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My Name as Cultural Artifact — by Beate Ziehres

Beate.  That’s how I answer frequently asked question about my name especially since I‘ve relocated from Northern Germany to the South East of the United States more than one year ago. At this point of the conversation, people hear my German name and realize that I’m a part of the new diverse community of Chattanooga TN. But just to say Beate is only half of the truth. Probably 95 percent of the members of Western cultures have at least two names: a first and a last name. I do so, too. Beate is my first name. My last name is worse. But let’s talk about my last name later, along the lines of good things first.

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