Category Archives: Inclusion

Diversity and Inclusion

Inclusion: Controversial, Emotional, but Not Optional — by Deborah Levine

Inclusion-related policies and legal regulations have long been part of economic and social change, and, at times, part of emotional and combustible debate.  Inclusion took 50 years of wrangling after the first Women’s Suffrage conference in the mid-1800s to achieve a constitutional amendment granting women the vote.  It took another 50 years for the Civil Rights Movement to seriously impact the workplace and establishment of the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC).  Almost 50 year later, we are seeing another major societal and economic transformation that questions the role of an inclusive diversity.

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Asian American Women Executives You Should Know — by Dr. Julia Wai-Yin So

To honor the success of Asian Americans in this country, I would like to highlight the professional lives of five prominent Asian female executives.  They have demonstrated a sense of pride in their own heritage and that this has not diminished their professional success in the western world.   They are among the most powerful women in the U.S.

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Understanding Asian American Communication — by Dr. Julia Wai-Yin So

Do you recall the first time you stepped into an international business reception at a major hotel and found yourself amidst a sea of Asian faces? If so, you may also have noticed a diversity of Asian cultures and conversations  in some incomprehensible languages: Cantonese Chinese, Hindi, Korean, Malay, Mandarin Chinese, Thai, Vietnamese, and perhaps others.  If you have been put off when people in your presence have spoken a language other than English, you are not alone.

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When Minorities become the Majority — by Dr. Julia Wai-Yin So

Not long ago, Texas made history.  It became a majority minority state. In other words, the minorities together make up more than 50% of the population. Here in Texas, diversity is a buzzword. Not only does it attract attention, it gets people excited, who now want to jump on the bandwagon to organize diversity initiatives such as cultural sensitivity training or setting up a diversity council.

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American Koreans Face Limited Healthcare — by Dr. Julia Wai-Yin  So

The nation is crying out for universal health care reform to provide adequate health insurance for the diverse citizens in the nation.  Yet, American diversity includes a group of individuals who remain silent as they continue to face limited access to health care because of their limited English proficiency (LEP).  A study released by the Kaiser Family Foundation in April, 2008 indicated that during 2004-2006 almost one third of non-elderly Korean Americans in the US do not have health insurance.

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Chopsticks Anyone? Now Made in the USA — Dr. Julia Wai-Yin So

To many of us, the idea of using two sticks with one hand to pick up a piece of chicken or vegetable from a plate or bowl and putting that same piece of chicken or vegetable into our mouth without dropping it is beyond one’s imagination. However, this is what one out of every five people in the world does at mealtime on a daily basis. These people with such dexterity with chopsticks live in what we call “chopsticks nations” such as China, Japan, Korea, and Vietnam.

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Quantum Leap for the Gay Movement – by Dr. Julia Wai-Yin So

After one of my lectures on the institution of family in the US in the fall of 2012, a student asked, “Do you think it will get better (the controversy over the legalization of same-sex marriage) or worse?” My answer: “better; but slow.” That fall, only seven states had legalized same-sex marriage. Fourteen months, that number has more than doubled to eighteen. How did this come about? Continue reading Quantum Leap for the Gay Movement – by Dr. Julia Wai-Yin So