Category Archives: Go Green

Refugees: Are We Eating our Young? – by Deborah Levine

Islands at Risk

Refugee International reported a few years ago that a Kiribatian man tried to convince a New Zealand court to make him the world’s first climate change refugee. Kiribati is an impoverished group of Pacific islands vulnerable to rising sea levels.  He didn’t succeed, but many experts predict a growing number of displaced people seeking asylum because of global warming. The planet has limited drinkable water, fertile land, clean air, and food. The planet’s current supplies are steadily shrinking.

Continue reading Refugees: Are We Eating our Young? – by Deborah Levine

2017 Goals: International Thought Leaders – by Deborah Levine

Reflecting global trends, here are the visions and goals of three thought leaders from their national perspectives. From the Ukraine, the goals reflect a tumultuous political environment, highlighting an increasingly common trend. From Ghana, the goals reflect issues of economics and the environment. Again, these two issues go hand-in-hand in multiple national debates with the pros and cons underscored in third world countries. The third set of goals come from the United Kingdom and highlight efforts to bridge the growing diversity in British Society. The contributors capture the changing politics, society, and environment that confront people around the world. Together, they are emblematic of the path thought leaders are taking in 2017

Continue reading 2017 Goals: International Thought Leaders – by Deborah Levine

Are Green Cities Symbols of Luxury? – by Ronny Agyei Yeboah

The term ‘green city’ or ‘sustainable city’ to many in the developing world is merely rhetoric of the affluent. The focus is often directed at exploiting our natural resource, creating more jobs, driving out extreme poverty, and improving standards of living of the masses with little concern for the environment. It’s not surprising that developing countries often battle International Environmental Agreements (IEAs) for special waivers when it comes to their implementations. The premise that economic progress and environmental welfare are inversely related, at least during the initial stages of development, is being held by many policymakers in developing countries. Scientific hypotheses such as the Environmental Cruznes curve postulate a U-shape relationship between environmental welfare and economic growth: environmental damages increase in the initial stages of per capita income growth, attains stability and then starts declining. These ideas help explain why the concept of green cities is less appealing in the developing world. Therefore, there should be an in-depth probe to find out whether the ‘green city’ concept hinders economic progress.

Continue reading Are Green Cities Symbols of Luxury? – by Ronny Agyei Yeboah

GECM: Ghana Environmental Concern Meter Update

A Study by The Centre for Environmental Research and Policy Analysis (CERPA)

The Ghana Environmental Concern Meter (GECM)  is a scientific and objective assessment of public concerns on various environmental issues and challenges affecting the lives of the Ghanaian people. It is also a detective and reporting tool for environmental problems in communities in Ghana. Further, the GECM seeks to bring these environmental problems to the knowledge of the public to encourage self-help, responsibility, and environmental ownership among the Ghanaian people.

Continue reading GECM: Ghana Environmental Concern Meter Update

Environmental Education Is Key to Solving Our Waste Problem – by Olumide IDOWU

We live in rapidly evolving societies, so why doesn’t our environmental sensitization adapt/conform to these changes?’’

Williams S. Anarfi explains – environmental education is becoming increasingly important as our lives, cities and priorities change. As our cities become more congested and busy, knowledge of the impact we each have on our surroundings becomes more and more crucial. Equally important however, is our understanding of how we can contribute to protecting the environment around us.

Continue reading Environmental Education Is Key to Solving Our Waste Problem – by Olumide IDOWU

Adapting to Climate Change: The Venice of Africa – by Olumide IDOWU

I nearly cried for the lives of people I came across living in affected areas. But I just have to say we have a lot to do when it comes to climate change adaptation after my journey to one of Africa’s slums called MAKOKO. Located in Lagos, Makoko and its three neighboring communities are connected by a bridge over a canal of murky black water.

Continue reading Adapting to Climate Change: The Venice of Africa – by Olumide IDOWU

TRANSPARENCY in The PARIS CLIMATE AGREEMENT – by Olumide Idowu

The Paris Climate Agreement sets crucial goals: to limit global temperature increase, and specific goals in three areas – mitigation, adaptation and finance. The long-term goal for mitigation is 2 °C strengthening to 1.5 °C which guides the Agreement. There is a global goal adaptation which includes increasing adaptive capacity and resilience; and a finance goal to increase post 2020 from $100 billion per year. Finance flows will have to balance adaptation and mitigation.

Continue reading TRANSPARENCY in The PARIS CLIMATE AGREEMENT – by Olumide Idowu

Waste Management for Sustainable Living – by Olumide Climate IDOWU

Nigeria is a great country with lot of resources that can keep the country in a very high standard of economy. Many Nigerians look at these resources and think that they can misuse rather than make use of their potential and make our community a better environment for all citizens. Waste management, the treatment and reuse of solid wastes, is vital. There are various types of solid waste including municipal (residential, institutional, commercial), agricultural, and special (health care, household hazardous wastes, sewage sludge).”

Continue reading Waste Management for Sustainable Living – by Olumide Climate IDOWU

We Will Do Very Little Business On A Dead Planet – by Christophe Poizat

It is a sad but true fact: we will do very little business on a dead planet. The pristine beauty of our planet is at risk of being destroyed. What has taken hundreds of millions of years to elaborate and many species could be forever gone within a few decades because of the negative impact humanity has on planet Earth.

Continue reading We Will Do Very Little Business On A Dead Planet – by Christophe Poizat

The Clock is Ticking for Climate Change in Nigeria — by Olumide Idowu

Climate change has become a new reality and a worldwide phenomenon with significant variation in weather patterns occurring over periods ranging from decades to millions of years.
Nigerians ask what is climate change for them; can Nigeria be affected; what impact will it have it on Nigeria? Can we mitigate the negative impact and ensure that climate change/global warming does not have disastrous consequence on Nigeria?

Continue reading The Clock is Ticking for Climate Change in Nigeria — by Olumide Idowu