Category Archives: Social Issues

Social causes, activism, and projects

Where are you from? — by Susan Popoola

I’ve been networking for years so by now I should be prepared for the fact that if I go to a networking event or any other type of business gathering sooner or later someone is bound to turn to me and ask the question “were are you from?”  On the face of it, it’s a very simple question – in fact I’m told it’s supposed to be a nice icebreaker, which “naturally” follows on from the question – “what’s your name?” or as some tend to say, “who are you?”

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Shadows Of Unsung Heroes: The Disabled– by Pat Garcia

Regardless of whether it is a sudden sickness, fever, or an accident, a disability forces a person to face a new reality.  No longer the same, he or she has to tackle the impediments that bind and overcome the barriers that appear on his or her horizon. A person in such a situation is labeled disabled.

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All Eyes on Ukraine: History-and-Culture Prophesy — by Dr. Fiona Citkin

Past predicts Future:  For over 20 years of my life in the US, always answering “Ukraine” when asked where I came from, I’d heard, “Aah, Russia!” The home to 45.4 million people, Ukraine was little known—until bloodshed on the Maidan Square in Kyiv and continuing mayhem provoked by expert Putin-esque instigators brought it into headlines. The media opinions, however, often understate the situation, thus hurting all-American understanding—and standing—in this strategically important European country.

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A Shout-Out Against Domestic Violence – by Terry Howard

There’s been so much in the news lately about gender, women in particular, specifically about the plight of women globally, how they’re faring in the sciences and on corporate boards, the abduction of the girls in Nigeria, the national fixation on Hillary …and it goes on and on and on. However, when it comes to gender, for me there’s no greater gift than my 4-year-old granddaughter, Nadia Lucille Howard.  You see, Nadia owns me, plain and simple. And she knows it.

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Does Religious Diversity Have a Future in the US? — by Deborah Levine and Terry Howard

Despite an increase in lawsuits related to religious expression and workplace discrimination, religious diversity is an area of Diversity & Inclusion often missing from leadership development.  The silence is due to lack of exposure and to fear, perhaps well-founded, that religious diversity training may actually increase animosity in the workplace, rather than build bridges. Given the recent Supreme Court ruling sanctioning public prayer as an American tradition, a tradition that has often been Christian, the role of diverse religions in the US is increasingly murky and contentious.

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Storm Volunteers Highlight Cultural Differences — by Beate Ziehres

I started to write this article while I was waiting to board a plane to Germany, my native country. My topic is helpfulness. I want to define the cultural differences around giving assistance between members of different nations. I want to share a few experiences here in the United States. They show a level of caring that’s really new to me.

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Roots of the Death Penalty and Racism — by Christopher Bear Beam

The Campaign to End the Death Penalty sponsored a presentation entitled “Lynching Then Lynching Now: the Roots of Racism and the Death Penalty in America”.  As the title of the workshop affirms, there is a direct link between those executed on Death Row and racism. Racism still permeates many levels of all our institutions, but there is no more glaring injustice to all people, especially to persons of color, than our criminal justice system. Just as lynching was an integral part of southern culture during slavery and the Jim Crow law, so has the incarceration of persons of color (and at every phase) become our new lynching – the history of the Death Penalty as it manifests today.

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No More Roadside Shrines — by Micki Peluso

No More Roadside Shrines: So No Parent ever has To Hear The last Words, “Bye Mom” From Their Child.

Makeshift memorials are reminders that we must put an end to drunken driving once and for all. How tired are we, and weary of riding, driving or walking past flowers and wreaths, hung on poles and laid by roadsides. They might be considered pretty, if not serving as reminders of young lives lost to DUI (driving under the influence) accidents and vehicular homicides? These memorials stand as a warning to further deter these senseless deaths and injuries.

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Children Lost Through a Failed System — by Micki Peluso

The problem lies mostly with the boys, but girls, too, are aggressive, prone to bad language and general destructive behavior. Bullying smaller children, fighting among themselves and surliness toward adults is common to both sexes.Yet to all appearances, these children seem normal. Some are deceptively lovable, polite and well-mannered. They smile easily and give the appearance of friendly, gregarious young children of ages from eight to twelve-years-old. Whatever their outward aspect, they are also emotionally distraught, street savvy, proficient liars, thieves and con artists.

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