Tag Archives: equality

Diversity, Dialogue, and Mindsight – by Greg Nees

Have you ever entered a conversation with the best of intentions, only to end up in an argument? I suspect we have all had this experience and I’d like to suggest that one reason this happens so often is because of mind distance. When we try to communicate with people whose experiences and world views are very different from our own, we often run into invisible walls. It’s like trying to describe colors to a friend who has been blind from birth. No matter how much we try to explain what the world looks, sounds, and feels like to us, if the other person’s experiences have been significantly different, they will have trouble listening and understanding. In my work as an interculturalist, I encounter such mind distance on a regular basis.

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Social Inequality and the Need for Education – by Natsuya Uesugi

Social inequality is systematically destroying the livelihood of many inner city communities. The threat is not only from unemployment, poverty, lack of social services, homelessness and the effects of gangs, violence and drug addiction, but rather it is an underpinning of the very fabric of society.

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Inequality, a Threat to Justice: Dalton State Joins the Discussion

“Inequality – in any form, against any person – is a threat to justice,” says Matt Hipps. Hipps, an assistant professor of political science and director of First-Year Experience at Dalton State, hopes to see public programs at the College geared toward getting people to discuss inequality in multiple forms.

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Quantum Leap for the Gay Movement – by Dr. Julia Wai-Yin So

After one of my lectures on the institution of family in the US in the fall of 2012, a student asked, “Do you think it will get better (the controversy over the legalization of same-sex marriage) or worse?” My answer: “better; but slow.” That fall, only seven states had legalized same-sex marriage. Fourteen months, that number has more than doubled to eighteen. How did this come about? Continue reading Quantum Leap for the Gay Movement – by Dr. Julia Wai-Yin So