Tag Archives: learning

About Deborah Levine

Deborah J. Levine is an award-winning, best-selling author, cross-cultural trainer, and inspirational speaker. Her lifetime passion for diversity and cross- cultural work began in childhood as one of few Jewish families in the British Bermuda and grew with her insertion into New York City area schools. A teenage activist, she joined her first civil rights picket line in 1965, was an early volunteer with SNCC, and joined the first Women’s Liberation March in NYC circa 1970. With degrees in cultural anthropology and urban planning, Deborah spent decades developing cultural programs. A former executive for Jewish advocacy organizations, Deborah is headquartered in Tennessee, is a cross-cultural trainer and consults on projects that broaden the Southern – Global Connection.

Continue reading About Deborah Levine

Roots, Shoots, Flowers, and Girls — by Susan Popoola

I’m aware that there are quite a number of groups and organisations that provide networking opportunities, support, training and work related opportunities for women. As a result when it became international news that over 200 hundred girls had been kidnapped in Northern Nigeria, I thought that there would be messages of concern and support added to our #BringBackOurGirls campaign from women’s groups across the world. When I mentioned this to a friend, she said that it probably didn’t happen because most groups focus primarily on women at the professional level.

Continue reading Roots, Shoots, Flowers, and Girls — by Susan Popoola

Education’s Ethnic and Racial Issues — Dr. Gail Dawson

Ethnic and Racial Disparity in education is a persistent societal problem. In light of changing demographics and an increasingly diverse society, we must find ways to address education disparities and close the gap. Three key factors contribute to differences in education for ethnic and racial minority children: Expectations, Exposure and Environment.

Continue reading Education’s Ethnic and Racial Issues — Dr. Gail Dawson

Universities Bid Farewell to Letter Grades — by Melanie Mayne

How much do grades actually matter in the real world? A letter doesn’t say much about what a person can do. A percentage doesn’t tell you how to do it better. In the real life, we are not graded. Life is too complicated to sum it up with a single letter. That’s why colleges and universities all over the world have revamped their grading policies.

Continue reading Universities Bid Farewell to Letter Grades — by Melanie Mayne

The New Must-Learns for Global Leadership Development — by Deborah Levine

The complex constellation of skills required for global leadership is continually morphing. The basic leadership competencies are only an axis around which revolve the specifics of local culture and the analytics of the target culture globally. Therefore, not only does the knowledge management evolve, but so does the audience for global leadership development. At one time, the audience was primarily executives involved in international relocation. Over time, that group widened to include those who work with them: Human Resource departments, Supply Chain groups, and professionals with frequent contact, particularly in the STEM fields: Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math. To stay competitive in this environment, virtually every nation on the face of the planet is extending their global leadership training into new arenas.

Continue reading The New Must-Learns for Global Leadership Development — by Deborah Levine

Talking to Children about Race and Breaking Taboos — By Jonathan R. Miller

I raised my hand during kindergarten class in 1979 when I was 5-years old and announced that I’m black. I actually got up on my feet to say it. I am black. And then afterward I sat back down again. I don’t remember what we were supposed to be doing at the time.

Continue reading Talking to Children about Race and Breaking Taboos — By Jonathan R. Miller

Diversity: One of Education’s Greatest Challenges — by Altha Manning

In my last article for American Diversity Report, “Embrace Diversity, Embrace the Future”, I used the example of Zanzibar and how the people there appeared to deal with diversity by accepting differences of other cultures including religion without co-mingling or requiring others to bend to the will of any one group.  However, since my visit there and writing that article, I have discovered that more recently, Muslim youth riding on motorcycles threw acid on the faces and bodies of three American young females who were walking through the streets of Zanzibar on their last evening in the city.  The girls were at the end of their mission to help out in the area and were going to celebrate their stay there.  They will forever be scarred both emotionally and physically by this experience.  This example simply shows how fragile our cultural stability is as mobility of the world’s people increases at a rapid pace and the introduction of new ideas, ways and cultures are seen as a threat to the old established ways.

Continue reading Diversity: One of Education’s Greatest Challenges — by Altha Manning

Are STEM Careers for Girls at Risk? — by Sheila Boyington

The U.S. faces an increasing shortage in the STEM workforce: employment in STEM occupations is expected to grow 17 percent by 2018, while the number of college graduates in STEM fields continues to decline. In 2009, just 18 percent of bachelor’s degrees awarded were in STEM fields, down from 24 percent two decades ago. Even more alarming: the gender and racial gap within the STEM workforce continues to widen. While women comprise 49% of the college-educated workforce, only 14% of engineers are women and just 27% are working in computer science and math positions. Similar disparities exist for Hispanic and African American workers, who account for only six percent of STEM workers. Recently it has come to light that the number of girls that are majoring in Computer Science has drastically dropped in the past 15 years.

Continue reading Are STEM Careers for Girls at Risk? — by Sheila Boyington

About Deborah Levine

Deborah is an award-winning, best-selling author, trainer, and inspirational speaker. Her lifetime passion for cross- cultural work began with a childhood as one of few Jewish families in the British colony of Bermuda and grew with her insertion into the New York City area in grade school. As a teenage activist, she joined her first civil rights picket line in 1965, was an early volunteer with SNCC, and joined the first Women’s Liberation March in NYC circa 1970. Continue reading About Deborah Levine