Category Archives: About Us

About the American Diversity Report

Perspectives: ADR Advisors and Colleagues

Perspectives and Quotes

Editor’s Note: In these challenging times when race-related issues are at the forefront of American society, the American Diversity Report is pleased to share quotes from our advisors and colleagues. I have no doubt that their words of wisdom will stick in our readers’ minds.

Continue reading Perspectives: ADR Advisors and Colleagues

Campaign: Boost the American Diversity Report

AMERICAN DIVERSITY REPORT LAUNCHES OUTREACH
CAMPAIGN TO PROMOTE DIVERSITY & INCLUSION,
CROSS-CULTURAL COMPETENCE, COUNTERACT HATE

ADR 
Free Online Resources Available to Improve Education, Communication & Training
  
CHATTANOOGA, TN — The American Diversity Report, an award-winning digital multimedia platform, today announced a new outreach campaign to raise public awareness and enhance understanding of critically important issues of diversity, inclusion, cross cultural competence, and counteracting hate.
 
Those interested in supporting the online initiative – including corporate America, academia, philanthropists, advocacy groups and individuals – can visit Boost American Diversity Report GoFundMe Campaign to consider a small donation of $10, $25 or more. The page also includes a video message from Editor-in-Chief Deborah Levine, who founded the American Diversity Report (ADR) 15 years ago and has single-handedly managed it despite chronic illness.


“My life’s work is helping people and organizations enhance diversity and inclusion, foster positive race relations, and improve cross cultural competency – all of which are fluid variables during these challenging times,” noted Levine, author of the recent book, When Hate Groups March Down Main Street: Engaging A Community Response. A book excerpt is available here.

 She added: “Vital support from the public will help optimize the ADR’s capacity, increase accessibility, and modernize the design for a broader reach and readership. Everyone can learn and benefit from the free educational resources available through the ADR. This is especially important in our increasingly multiracial, multiethnic and multicultural society.”
 
Levine has been a nationally-recognized diversity futurist and change agent for 30 years. She was recently named by Forbes magazine as a top Diversity and Inclusion Trailblazer. She is also an award-winning author of 15 books, as well as an opinion columnist for The Chattanooga Times Free Press newspaper.
 
Among her many achievements, Levine received the Champion of Diversity Award from DiversityBusiness.com, the Excellence Award from the Tennessee Economic Council on Women, and the Chattanooga Award for Management Consulting. Her published articles span decades in journals and magazines including, The American Journal of Community Psychology, Journal of Public Management & Social Policy, The Bermuda Magazine, and The Harvard Divinity School Bulletin. A former blogger for The Huffington Post, Levine has been featured on C-SPAN Book TV and other media venues.

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July 4th Prayer – by Deborah Levine

Originally written for Generation 42 Global Reformers July 4th Prayer Service 

As we gather together virtually for the July 4th celebration, my first thought is to ask for the blessing of our Creator who has placed us all on this precious planet. Our faith leads us to a shared hope for a future where we can harmonize, not homogenize, at the intersection of race, ethnicity, religion, generation, and gender represented in this country. That hope was not a conscious one growing up in British Bermuda as the only Jewish little girl on the island. But I’m honored to now be recognized as a Diversity & Inclusion Trailblazer by Forbes Magazine. And I’m both honored and astounded to be an Award-winning author of 15 books on cultural diversity and the founder of the American Diversity Report where I’ve served as editor for 15 years.

I’m astounded because my early dream was to be a ballerina, forever in pink ballet slippers. But God had other plans for me. Perhaps that’s why, even as a youngster, I was surrounded by diverse cultures and appreciated their artistic expressions.
Continue reading July 4th Prayer – by Deborah Levine

To mask or not to mask – by Deborah Levine

Originally published in The Chattanooga Times Free Press

I got a call from my cousin Lenny from a New York hospital telling me that they’d just admitted his elderly mother into the emergency room. He was upset because the hospital restricted his time with his mother as part of COVID-19 protocols.  But “Upset” didn’t cover his reaction to the receptionist not wearing a mask and neither a few of the medical staff. He made his objections loud and clear and took pictures on his phone. At that point, security was called and he got tossed out.  Picturing this kerfuffle over my aunt’s prone body, I’m taking the war over masks personally.

When I see headlines about North Dakota’s Republican governor Doug Burgum being on “brink of tears as he decries ‘mask shaming’, I’m horrified that the governor had to beg but encouraged that he had the courage to do so. It takes guts for a Republican governor to antagonize the anti-maskers when Biden says yes and Trump says no way. The battle’s begun in a presidential campaign fight to the political death.

Continue reading To mask or not to mask – by Deborah Levine

A COVID-19 Mother’s Day Gift – by Deborah Levine

Originally published in The Chattanooga Times Free Press

Maybe you’ll get to hug your mom in person this weekend, but it’s likely that your Mother’s Day moment will be online or by phone. We’re not back to what we call normal and travel is still a luxury many of us don’t have. Especially if Moms are older and health-compromised. COVID -19 may have many of us disappointed over missing a warm embrace, but it should also make us plan the appreciation of the women in our families, and communities, more deliberately.

My daughter in New England announced weeks in advance that my Mother’s Day gift would be arriving soon. It doesn’t matter what kind of present she sends, I could feel her love bubble up through my cell phone. And she probably felt the mommy love I sent her way. We both know that feeling well. It just gets magnified thinking of Mother’s Day. Continue reading A COVID-19 Mother’s Day Gift – by Deborah Levine

Dear Ms. What’s your name – by Terry Howard

Okay, you don’t know me and I don’t know you. And maybe that’s a good thing because you may not like what I’m about to say to you Ms. “What’s your name?”

You see, I pulled up in my SUV the other week, parked, put on my mask and was about to head into the grocery store when I saw you and your three young kids – two in car seats if I remember correctly – in the parking space next to me. And by the way, your kids – all less than five years old I’d guess – are absolutely beautiful. You must be one proud momma.

Now there was nothing out of the ordinary for me until I saw you roll down your window and pluck out a still smoldering cigarette you’d been puffing on. Hey, I thought (and wanted to shout) “hey lady, haven’t you heard about the dangers of second-hand smoke on children?” as I walked towards the store.

Continue reading Dear Ms. What’s your name – by Terry Howard

My Lifelong Journey as a Trailblazer for Diversity & Inclusion – by Deborah Levine

Why I created the ADR and
Why we need your support

When asked why I created the American Diversity Report (ADR), I’m tempted to answer that diversity is in my DNA. I was brought up as the only Jewish little girl on the 24 square miles of British Bermuda in a family that immigrated from Russian territories. When we moved to New York, I was bullied for my colonial British accent and found comfort in the music, dance, and folktales of diverse cultures. I played the violin, performed ballet, and wrote stories and poems to express my sense of exclusion. When illness prevented all other expression, reading became my world and writing became my voice.

Two decades ago, I had to resign my job as an executive director of a Jewish Federation because I’d almost died on a mission to Uzbekistan, diversity again surfaced as my passion. But this time, I wanted to leave a legacy that would change the world. I created the Women’s Council on Diversity along with a community Global Leadership Course and a Youth Multicultural video contest. But of all my creations, the American Diversity Report is closest to my heart.

I persevere in this endeavor despite ongoing health challenges. I’m now in my golden years and have endured major surgery resulting in my being unable to speak for years. Unfortunately, I’ve also suffered through mourning the deaths of every member of my nuclear family. May they Rest In Peace.

I’m grateful for my life and the ability to continue my father’s legacy as a U.S. military intelligence officer who liberated a Nazi death camp during World War II. In addition to being the founder and editor-in-chief of ADR, I have served as the executive director of Jewish Federations, created the DuPage/Chicago Interfaith Resource Network and the Southeast Women’s Council on Diversity.

While working in Tulsa, I was trained by the FBI in addressing and responding to hate groups after the tragic Oklahoma City bombing and destruction of the Murrah federal building by white supremacist domestic terrorists. I currently serve on the Tennessee Holocaust Commission and the Chattanooga Council Against Hate. My latest book is titled “When Hate Groups March Down Main Street: Engaging A Community Response”.

Deborah Levine at her book signing

In addition to being an award-winning author of 15 books — and being named by Forbes Magazine as a top “Diversity and Inclusion Trailblazer” — I am still humbled by the honor of giving people a voice through the ADR. It’s a privilege to engage every day with people of goodwill in tikkun olam (which in Hebrew means “repair of the world“).

The ADR has benefitted the workplace and communities locally, nationally and globally for the past 15 years. The ADR has always been free of charge as part of my lifetime efforts to help foster humanity’s understanding and acceptance of diversity, inclusion and related issues in our increasingly multicultural, multiracial and multiethnic nation — and, indeed, the world.

I’ve had no greater calling in my quest to shape a better future than the ADR. Not only does it deliver a vital message about the importance of diversity and inclusion, but it helps make our world a better place for all people. The ADR is needed now more than ever, as current events attest.

My goal is to ensure that the American Diversity Report will continue to provide a valuable public service as an educational and informational online media platform and training resource for a new generation of leaders — and for every generation.

CLICK to join the Boost the American Diversity Report Campaign.

The funds will be leveraged to expand the award-winning ADR platform, which hosts a diverse writers community of more than 800 articles, podcasts and community projects like ADR New Beginnings. The funds will also boost the ADR’s reach and readership of expert articles covering timely issues of race, color, ethnicity, gender, age, religion, disability, sexual orientation, generational differences, and thought leadership on diversity and inclusion.

The Fall edition if the ADR begins in September. Therefore, I hope to reach our funding goal by August 31 with your generous help and kind support. Please join me in my mission to Promote Diversity, Foster Inclusion and Counteract Hate. Together, we can make a real and lasting impact for the betterment of society during these troubling times and for all times.

I will thank all the ADR contributors in the September newsletter, but I can’t thank you enough for your kind consideration to make a lasting real-world difference by supporting diversity and inclusion efforts which are needed now more than ever.

Thank you and God bless you.

What is Juneteenth and Why? – by Vincent I. Phipps

Foremost Happy Juneteenth to Everyone!

On January 1, 1863, the Emancipation Proclamation was the judiciary treaty signed by President Abraham Lincoln which was the country’s official acknowledgment to abolish slavery.

But did it?

Many of us were taught in school the importance of dates:

*1492, Columbus sailed the ocean blue
*1920 Women’s right to fight, suffrage allowing women voting
*1969, Moon landing, “One giant leap for mankind”
*2009, America’s first president of color, Pres. Barack Obama

*1863, the ending of slavery, right?

Am in being picky about a date? Darn right!

Although the Civil War ended in April 1865 when Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee surrendered at Appomattox, Virginia, enslaved people in Texas didn’t learn about their freedom until June 19, 1865.

About 2.5 years after Lincoln signed the Emancipation Proclamation, it was Maj. Gen. Gordon Granger of the Union army who finally arrived in Galveston and issued General Order No. 3 that secured the Union army’s authority over Texas.

The last city in the United States to be informed of the ending of slavery was in a small town called Galveston, TX, in 1865!

How could this have occurred?

The same way we have the losses of the lives of Mr. George Floyd, Mr. Eric Garner, Mr. Rayshard Brooks, and hundreds more!  The same way we have yet to properly prosecute those who fail to protect.

People who could help stood by and did or said nothing.

Juneteenth celebrates human freedom.  Slave owners in 1865, knowingly broke the law-keeping their slaves in bondage through the Fall of 1865 to capitalize on more free labor.

Consider this?

**What if the minimum wage was increased to $100 / hour but for 2.5 years you were paid at your current rate?

**What if a mysterious stranger paid your rent for the next 2.5 years and your landlord forgets or chooses not to tell you?

**What if your mortgage or car note were paid off and your lender kept taking your monthly payments for almost the next three years?

Get the point?

In “Lone Star Pasts” Susan Merritt reported:

“Lots of Negroes were killed after freedom…bushwhacked, shot down while they were trying to get a way. You could see lots of Negroes hanging from trees.”

Freedom is not an African-American right.  Freedom is a human right.  Juneteenth is more than slaves being freed. It is recognition of a system’s acknowledgment about how immoral, unjust, and unethical the ideology that people could own other people was wrong.

Juneteenth (annually June 19), is to be celebrated by everyone.

ADR Juneteenth Press Release

ADRFOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
June 19, 2020
Contact: Deborah Levine:  Deborah@diversityreport.com
____

AMERICAN DIVERSITY REPORT PUBLISHES
SPECIAL JUNETEENTH ISSUE
 
Includes Advisory Board Perspectives on Systemic Racism, Black Lives Matter, Diversity Leadership, Criminal Justice Reform, Recent Police Killings of African Americans
  
CHATTANOOGA, Tenn. – Deborah Levine Enterprises, LLC today announced the issuance of a special Juneteenth holiday edition of the American Diversity Report (ADR), an award-winning digital media platform and educational resource, available at AmericanDiversityReport.com
The special Juneteenth edition (CLICK for articles) is comprised of exclusive articles and unique perspectives from ADR’s advisory board members and contributors, who represent a broad range of professional backgrounds, subject matter expertise, and thought leadership on issues of diversity and inclusion, equal opportunity, social justice, and related topics. Further information about the ADR team can be found at https://americandiversityreport.com/adr-team/
“During these challenging times when race-related issues are at the forefront of national attention, the American Diversity Report is pleased to share our insights with the public to enhance educational awareness, build mutual understanding, and foster constructive dialogue,” said Deborah Levine, Editor-in-Chief of ADR.
“It was 25 years ago when I was working in Tulsa that I observed Juneteenth and the 75th anniversary of the horrific Black Wall Street massacre,” she added. “While much progress has been made over the years and decades, much work remains. America must stay true to the promise of full equality for all citizens in our increasingly diverse society and workplace.”
In addition to being the founder and publisher of ADR, diversity futurist Deborah Levine is a leading management consultant, keynote speaker, award-winning author of 15 books, and an opinion columnist for the Times Free Press of Chattanooga. She was recently recognized by Forbes magazine as being among the nation’s top Diversity and Inclusion Trailblazers. Her latest book is titled, When Hate Groups March Down Main Street: Engaging A Community Response (co-authored with Marc Brenman via Roman & Littlefield).
More information about Deborah Levine Enterprises, LLC — including corporate webinars, online trainings, and other diversity management resources – is available at deborahlevine.com