Tag Archives: Women’s History Month

History for Women’s History Month – by Deborah Levine

Is Women’s History Month still relevant today? Is the need for sisterhood activism over as some say? We look back at the first group to advocate for women’s right to vote nationally and see that it was ultimately successful. The Seneca Falls Woman’s Rights Convention was held long ago in1848. But the words of its organizer Elizabeth Cady Stanton still hold true and yet are still controversial, “We hold these truths to be self-evident: that all men and women are created equal.”

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Women’s History Month: Gender Equality in STEM – by Deborah Levine

Women’s History Month has often focused on gender equality in STEM (science, technology, engineering, and math), and the lack thereof. The issues that result in low numbers begin early in life and continue into higher education. By the time students reach college, women are significantly underrepresented in STEM majors. Only around 19% of computer and information science majors are women. And only 38% of women who major in computers end up working work in computer fields.

The American Association of University Women (AAUW) has advocated for gender equality in the academic world and workplace over multiple decades. It’s recent suggestions for STEM education continue that advocacy and include:   

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STEM Women Study Guide

Groundbreaking STEM Women
Editor: Deborah Levine

  •  Profiles Past & Present

  • Discussion Q & A

  • Interactive  Exercises

Ideal for encouraging women to pursue STEM: Science, Technology,  Engineering & Mathematics.

TABLE of CONTENTS:

    • Ada Lovelace
    • Alice Augusta Ball
    • Anita Borg
    • Annie J. Easley
    • Asima Chatterjee
    • Bessie Virginia Blount
    • Carolyn Denning
    • Charlotte Scott
    • Emily Roebling
    • Emmy Noether
    • Grace Hopper
    • Giuliana Tesoro
    • Hattie Alexander
    • Helen Newton Turner
    • Hypatia
    • Jane Cooke Wright
    • Jewel Plummer
    • Kadambini Ganguly
    • Karin Blakemore
    • Lillian Gilbreth
    • Mabel Staupers
    • Maria Agnesi
    • Marie Curie
    • Marie Maynard Daly
    • Mary-Claire King
    • Mary Ellen Avery
    • Mary Fairfax
    • Patricia Bath
    • Patsy Sherman
    • Rosalind Franklin
    • Sally Ride
    • Sofia Kovelevskaya
    • Stephanie Kwolek
    • Temple Grandin
    • Virginia Apgar
    • Vivian Pinn
    • Wangari Maathai
    • CHATTANOOGANS
      • Sheila C. Boyington
      • Alyssa J. Montague
      • Heidi Hefferlin
      • Jemila Morson
      • Lakweshia Ewing
      • Dr. Neslihan Alp
      • Sonya Reid
      • Dr. Ruth Williams

Many thanks to Southern Adventist University for its collaboration in creating this guide for Women’s History Month and for students year-round. 

KALLIE MARIE Podcast: Gender in Audio/Music Production

Kallie KALLIE MARIE is a recording engineer and record producer who has worked with a variety of artists and bands. She is also an award winning composer, whose work with MPath Tracks won a Broadcast Production Music Award. She has written music for film, TV, choreographers, and has a strong interest in creating music for video games. She is also a freelance writer for Sonic Scoop, as well as a published author with Routledge Taylor Francis, and her latest title with Rowman & Littlefield.

Hear Kallie discuss:

  • How her research about women in this industry come about?
  • Who did she interview?
  • What can some one not involved in audio/music production take away from reading this book?
  • How can we keep our conversations and efforts for gender equality intersectional?

CLICK to pre-order Kallie’s book,  Conversations with Women in Music Production: The Interviews

CLICK for PODCAST

My Salute to Women Overcoming Challenges – by Soumaya Khalifa

Resilience, Determination, Support and Hard Work

This Women’s History Month I am thankful for the many women who paved the way for me. These amazing women include my mother, sister, daughter, mentors, friends, colleagues, managers and too many others to list.  With these women as guides and companions, my path has been smooth yet challenging, steady yet adventurous.  For all of those women, I am deeply grateful.

I know a beautiful five year-old named Samira.  At birth, she was diagnosed with a rare genetic mutation that doctors thought would keep her from seeing, speaking, walking, running and living her life like any typical child.  Of course, her family was devastated: they wanted only the best for their newborn daughter.  Samira’s mother, however, immediately jumped into action.  She sought doctors who specialized in Samira’s condition and found the physical, occupational, speech and other therapies that she needed to thrive.  Samira’s mom fought the doctors, therapists and insurance companies to make sure her daughter received the best treatments and support.

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A Post-Pandemic Recovery Playbook for Women  – by Cathy Light

As vaccines roll out, we turn our attention toward economic recovery. The traditional stimulus measures of the past, dominated by investment in infrastructure and construction, will not be effective in our post-pandemic world. Those sectors are male-majority employers, and COVID-19 has had a disproportionate impact on women.

According to the U.S. Department of Labor, in one month (September 2020), more than 1 million Americans over the age of 20 left the U.S. workforce. Roughly 80% – over 865,000 of them – were women. There are now nearly 2.2 million fewer women in the labor force than there were in February 2020 before the pandemic. In October 2020, the U.S. retail trade sector gained 103,700 jobs. Women accounted for only 11.4% of those gains, despite making up 48.4% of the retail trade workforce. We must do better.
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Maybe Some Silver Linings – by Gay Morgan Moore

The world will long remember the past year!  We were thrust into circumstances that will forever change us individually and globally. We know the results – over 530,000 dead in the United States alone, millions sickened, an economy in free fall struggling to recover, a severely challenged health care system, new medicines, new disease conditions, and trillions of dollars in government spending attempting to ameliorate the effects of this global pandemic. The list of negative consequences goes on. But are there some “silver linings?” Is there some good coming from this daunting and often frightening global challenge?
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I’m Black and I’m Proud – by Eva Johnson

Eva Johnson and John Lewis
Eva Johnson and John Lewis

I attended 12 public schools in Chattanooga during times when almost everything was racially separated: schools, churches, restaurants, tours,  organization memberships.  After my high school  graduation and an  early marriage, I relocated  with family to New England and eventually graduated from  Southern Connecticut University.  In the mid-seventies when I became an educator in a large suburban high school in Hamden, Connecticut, only about 10% of the school’s staff and student body was African American.  

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Women’s History Month Tribute to the Queen of Soul – by Elwood Watson

of soul
Aretha Franklin

During Women’s History Month we pause to remember and celebrate the achievements of iconic women who positively contributed to shaping the social fabric of America.

One such woman is the spectacular singer, Aretha Franklin. She is still affectionately known as the “Queen of Soul” to her countless millions of fans and others worldwide who span generations of every race, color, gender, age and ethnicity.

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Corporate Women in Tech Part 2 – by Tamara Backovic

in techHow Dominant Is Bro Culture in Tech?

Whether we like it or not, it is clear that gender equality in the tech world is still a dream, not a reality. When it comes to women in tech statistics, they show a drastic gender gap. 

For instance, women hold only 24% of jobs in the tech field.

Nonetheless, the situation seems to be improving in the recent period. The likes of Indra Nooyi or Ginni Rometty are leading by example. These women can act like the lighthouses, which we all need to help us enter a better future.

So, how does the “bro culture” affect the position of women in the modern tech industry? To answer this question, we will need to dig deeper into the corporate world. Thus, let’s not waste any more time and start looking for clues and relevant information.

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