Category Archives: Gender

Gender differences, LGBQT

Improving Gender Diversity Hiring – by Addie Swartz

Returning from The Great Resignation

Recent findings from the Pew Research Center uncovered that across 34 countries, a median of 94% of respondents think it is important for women in their country to have the same rights as men, with 74% saying it is very important. Yet, women are less optimistic than men that they will achieve gender equality. How can these two diametrically opposed trends exist in the same world at the same time? It’s the sad reality for women in the world and the workplace that while their talent abounds, opportunity does not.

The numbers simply do not lie. According to the World Economic Forum, it will now take 135.6 years to close the gender gap worldwide. Post-pandemic, there’s a dearth of women in leadership roles, estimated to be only 27 percent of all managerial positions. According to McKinsey, the gender-regressive reality of these trends might mean that global GDP growth will be $1 trillion lower in 2030; conversely, taking action to advance gender equality could add as much as $13 trillion to the global economy by the same year.

Continue reading Improving Gender Diversity Hiring – by Addie Swartz

 Are Men Necessary?  – by Terry Howard

On my way out of a local fitness center, I happened across a used book dispenser and, like I always do, peered inside. The cover of one of those books, “Are Men Necessary?” by Maureen Dowd was indeed an attention getter if ever there was one. Although I was amused by it, some may find the book’s title off putting. Yes, I get that. 

Which brings us to the issue of men these days – more to the point, arguments for and against the “necessity” of men as Dowd put it. 

Let’s start by applying the (non-procreation) “necessity” test to a partial list of “men” as we think about the behaviors of some (note that I didn’t say “all”) men these days.

Continue reading  Are Men Necessary?  – by Terry Howard

4 Challenges Women Face in the STEM Fields – by Julie Morris

How to Overcome Them

Representation is important, and more voices at the table make for better decisions, better products, and more inclusive business practices. While the fields of science, technology, engineering, and math continue to grow and change, the need for highly-motivated, well-trained women is also on the rise. However, men still make up nearly 75% of the STEM workforce and women still face several barriers to entry in these high-demand careers.

Continue reading 4 Challenges Women Face in the STEM Fields – by Julie Morris

History for Women’s History Month – by Deborah Levine

Is Women’s History Month still relevant today? Is the need for sisterhood activism over as some say? We look back at the first group to advocate for women’s right to vote nationally and see that it was ultimately successful. The Seneca Falls Woman’s Rights Convention was held long ago in1848. But the words of its organizer Elizabeth Cady Stanton still hold true and yet are still controversial, “We hold these truths to be self-evident: that all men and women are created equal.”

Continue reading History for Women’s History Month – by Deborah Levine

Women’s History Month: Gender Equality in STEM – by Deborah Levine

Women’s History Month has often focused on gender equality in STEM (science, technology, engineering, and math), and the lack thereof. The issues that result in low numbers begin early in life and continue into higher education. By the time students reach college, women are significantly underrepresented in STEM majors. Only around 19% of computer and information science majors are women. And only 38% of women who major in computers end up working work in computer fields.

The American Association of University Women (AAUW) has advocated for gender equality in the academic world and workplace over multiple decades. It’s recent suggestions for STEM education continue that advocacy and include:   

Continue reading Women’s History Month: Gender Equality in STEM – by Deborah Levine

STEM Women Study Guide

Groundbreaking STEM Women
Editor: Deborah Levine

  •  Profiles Past & Present

  • Discussion Q & A

  • Interactive  Exercises

Ideal for encouraging women to pursue STEM: Science, Technology,  Engineering & Mathematics.

TABLE of CONTENTS:

    • Ada Lovelace
    • Alice Augusta Ball
    • Anita Borg
    • Annie J. Easley
    • Asima Chatterjee
    • Bessie Virginia Blount
    • Carolyn Denning
    • Charlotte Scott
    • Emily Roebling
    • Emmy Noether
    • Grace Hopper
    • Giuliana Tesoro
    • Hattie Alexander
    • Helen Newton Turner
    • Hypatia
    • Jane Cooke Wright
    • Jewel Plummer
    • Kadambini Ganguly
    • Karin Blakemore
    • Lillian Gilbreth
    • Mabel Staupers
    • Maria Agnesi
    • Marie Curie
    • Marie Maynard Daly
    • Mary-Claire King
    • Mary Ellen Avery
    • Mary Fairfax
    • Patricia Bath
    • Patsy Sherman
    • Rosalind Franklin
    • Sally Ride
    • Sofia Kovelevskaya
    • Stephanie Kwolek
    • Temple Grandin
    • Virginia Apgar
    • Vivian Pinn
    • Wangari Maathai
    • CHATTANOOGANS
      • Sheila C. Boyington
      • Alyssa J. Montague
      • Heidi Hefferlin
      • Jemila Morson
      • Lakweshia Ewing
      • Dr. Neslihan Alp
      • Sonya Reid
      • Dr. Ruth Williams

Many thanks to Southern Adventist University for its collaboration in creating this guide for Women’s History Month and for students year-round. 

Ukraine Makes the Headlines, Again – by Dr. Fiona Citkin

(originally published in 2019 – more relevant than ever!)

I periodically become a target of all-around questioning just because originally—more than 25 years ago—I came to the US from Ukraine as a Fulbright Scholar. Of course, this gives me the leverage to deeper understand what’s going on there, and why. But I do not hold a magic ball that predicts what the future holds in a largely unpredictable country – and even more unpredictable America under the current government. So, let me just answer some of these questions and clarify my positioning. Continue reading Ukraine Makes the Headlines, Again – by Dr. Fiona Citkin

Diversity in Tech Tips – by Pearl Kasirye

The tech industry is one of the fastest-growing industries in the world. We live in a digital era where technology has become an essential part of our daily lives and work processes. For this reason, we need tech companies that create software that improves our lives, cybersecurity agencies that protect our online data, and experts who develop new technologies annually.

There is a high demand for technology and people who specialize in this field. What strikes me the most is the lack of diversity in such an essential industry like tech. Are the most qualified people always white and male? Or are other groups of people intentionally underrepresented?

Continue reading Diversity in Tech Tips – by Pearl Kasirye

The exam paper that stumped all – by Mona Bopanna

How will India respond in 2022 to this regressive stance towards women?

In December, 2021, millions of secondary school students in India appeared for their Class X (Grade 10) exams conducted by the Central Board of Secondary Education (CBSE).

Since its inception in the 1920s, the Board has gone through several changes and emerged as one of the largest such organisations in the world, with more than 25,000 school — based in India and other countries — affiliated to it. Each year, about 2 million students take the secondary board exams.

Continue reading The exam paper that stumped all – by Mona Bopanna

Diversity Town Hall 2021: Deborah Levine – ADR Editor

Diversity Town Hall DEI OVERVIEW  BizUTC

Editor’s Note: This was the introductory presentation at the 2021 Diversity Town Hall in partnership with the Gary  W. Rollins College of Business /U. of TN at  Chattanooga (Moderator Dr. Gail Dawson) and the American Diversity Report. 

CLICK to hear presentation

TRANSCRIPT:

I appreciate both the eagerness and anxiety about the future of the diverse workplace and I’m often asked to predict what that future will look like. Predicting the future requires looking at the past – at the history of the diversity field and how it developed. I’ll get personal here and go back to New York City 40 years ago. I had just graduated college with a degree in anthropology based on cultural structuralism along with the science of storytelling. I was excited about getting a job, but was considered esoteric and irrelevant. And female. No one would hire me. Still hopeful, I went to an employment agency in Manhattan. As soon as I walked in the door, the office manager insisted that I sit at the all-women’s table and take a typing test. I said no and moved to sit at the all-men’s table where they were interviewed for executive positions. The manager said no. I insisted, he physically blocked me. I insisted again, he threatened to call the police.

Continue reading Diversity Town Hall 2021: Deborah Levine – ADR Editor