Category Archives: Holocaust

Articles about the Holocaust

UNTOLD Stories of a World War II Liberator

Documentary of a Ritchie Boy Liberator

Deborah Levine, daughter of a World War II military intelligence officer, shares first-hand stories of WW II and the Holocaust with wartime letters of her father, Aaron Levine. He was a ” Ritchie Boy” trained at Fort Ritchie, the U.S. secret military intelligence camp focused on training men, often Jewish immigrants who spoke German, to interrogate Nazi prisoners of war.
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Hear the wartime love letters of Estelle Malloy, a Special Education pioneer whom Aaron married after they graduated from Harvard. Then you’ll hear the memoirs of Polish Holocaust Survivor, Leon Weisband. First, we’ll start with Aaron’s immigrant roots from the Ukraine-Latvia region. Next, we’ll see Estelle’s childhood in Bermuda in the only Jewish family to have lived on the island for 4 generations.

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Radio Theater: UNTOLD Stories of a World War II Liberator

Deborah Levine, daughter of a World War II military Award winner intelligence officer, shares first-hand stories of WW II and the Holocaust with wartime letters of her father, Aaron Levine. He was assigned to interrogate Nazi prisoners of war.
Scroll down for more info and link)

UntoldHear the wartime love letters of Estelle Malloy, a Special Education pioneer whom Aaron married after they graduated from Harvard. Then you’ll hear the memoirs of Polish Holocaust Survivor, Leon Weisband. First, we’ll start with Aaron’s immigrant roots from the Ukraine-Latvia region. Next, we’ll see Estelle’s childhood in Bermuda in the only Jewish family to have lived on the island for 4 generations.

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TV Pilot Script: The Liberator’s Daughter

 LOGLINE

A World War II Liberator’s daughter honors his legacy by battling disabilities, discrimination, and hate in her journey from homeless to repairing our broken world.
A 6-part TV Series
(c) 2022…Deborah Levine Enterprises LLC

21 FILM FESTIVAL  AWARDS
The Liberator’s Daughter,  is a Winner at 21 film festivals:
1) WRPN Women’s International Film Festival, 2) Hollywood Blvd Film Festival, 3) Cineplay International, 4) Dallas Shorts, 5) ndiefare International, 6) Airflix Film, 7) Multi Dimension International, 8) Bright International, 9) EdiPlay International, 10) Magic Silver Screen Festival,11) Medudsa Film Festival, 12) Movie Play International, 13) Red Moon Film Festival, 14) Krimson Horyzon, 15) Cult Movies Festival, 16) Crown International, 17) Swedish International, 18) NYC International Film Festival, 19) London New Wave Cinema Awards, 20) Indie Cine Tube Awards, 21) 4th Dimension Independent film Festival.
– It’s also a Finalist at 3 film festivals: Delta International, Filmfest International, Blackboard International, + Honorable Mention at 1) Critic’s Choice International, 2) The Filmmaker’s Space Film Festival

Pilot Summary: ADRIFT Part A

This story of overcoming adversity features a young woman adrift in New York City. She experiences hate and bullying like so many immigrants and wants to return home to Bermuda. Her father, a World War II military intelligence officer, wants the family to experience a Jewish community. Although her fragile health is at risk in America, Deborah uses her genius IQ to attend Radcliffe/Harvard University. Always outspoken, she challenges the university’s status quo while pursuing studies at Harvard Divinity School and in Folklore and Mythology.
Midway through college, she returns home, her body racked with mysterious inflammation. Like so many young women suffering similarly, Deborah is told it’s all in her head and is sent to a psychiatric hospital. Determination drives her back to Harvard, but insufficiently recovered, she again goes home, completing her degree in NYC.
Deborah’s parents are disappointed and insist that she not be a financial burden. Pressured to quickly get a job after graduation, she becomes a file clerk in Manhattan’s Garment District. Experiencing sexual harassment, she joins the first Women’s Liberation March and reconnects with girl friends.
Deborah finally gets promoted to secretary only to find out that her parents are relocating to Cincinnati for her father’s job. With no resources of her own, she has to leave with her parents for an unknown future in the Midwest. Discouraged, she almost gives up. But inspired by her friends, she prays for a future of fame and power.

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Reflections on the Holocaust — by Deborah Levine

As my radio theater play, UNTOLD: Stories of a World War II Liberator, is in preparation for broadcast, I am reminded of the 1st time that I agreed to serve on the local Holocaust Remembrance Day Committee was painful, even after almost seventy years since the end of World War II.  I agreed to assist in promoting the event beyond our Jewish community and I agreed to participate in the reading of the names of the victims.  And I resigned myself to being an usher at the event, not my favorite thing.  What I didn’t bargain for was a seat on the stage when I offhandedly shared that I was helping in memory of my father who was a U. S. military intelligence officer during World War II.  Aaron Levine was an army translator of German and French.  And by the way, he was a liberator of a labor camp.

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Our Fathers: Learning from Wounds – by Laszlo Petrovics

Perhaps the past Century will not be known for the World Wars, for the atom bomb, for the rapid growth of scientific technology leading to IT, nor for even the Holocaust and a new awareness of crimes against humanity. In the long eye of history, perhaps the past Century will be known for fatherlessness. As such it will also be known for “Atyahiány”, Our Father’s absence, a most bitter and embittering fatherlessness: For Hitler was fatherless, Stalin was fatherless, Sceuicescu, the tyrant of Romania, was a bastard, Sadam Hussein of Iraq had no father, the ruler of Libya, Khadaffi was fatherless, Castro was a bastard.

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Jewish Heritage – by Lisa M. Scuderi-Burkimsher

When I was a sophomore in high school, my history teacher showed us a film during Hitler’s reign. The graphic film gave me nightmares for over a week. In great detail the atrocities of the Jewish people were in front of my eyes. Bodies of loved ones were dumped into a pile as the families were forced to watch in the cold, emaciated and near death themselves. The scene of women standing naked outside, holding their hands over their private areas was appalling. Not long ago I read that some women would cut their skin and use the blood to give them coloring. That was what Hitler had done. It didn’t matter that some were German, his own people, it mattered that they were Jewish. I can’t fathom a person having done such harm. In an article it said that he loathed the Jewish population because they took away jobs. We’ll never fully understand or know what was behind his madness.

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For International Holocaust Remembrance Day – Poem by Marilyn Kallet

My Holocaust research started with SW Germany, where my relatives were rounded up. My great-aunt, Hedwig Schwarz, was the only Jew to escape deportation in Horb/Rexingen. She was handicapped before the Holocaust, fell off the transport car, and was rescued by a nameless person who took her to Marienhopital in Stuttgart, where the nuns cared for her. My sister, daughter and I visited the hospital to thank the current generation of sisters for taking care of Hedwig. They told us that Hedwig was the only Jew in the hospital, though there were some Resistance members; and they treated her with silence, because they thought that was the best medicine. Can you imagine!

Here’s a poem I wrote about echoes in Horb and a photo of Hedwig in her hospital bed, surrounded by photos of all the others who were taken. The poem was first published in Prism: An Interdisciplinary Journal for Holocaust Educators, and in Packing Light: New and Selected Poems, Black Widow Press. 2009.

 International Holocaust Remembrance Day

Mezuzah
  In Memory, Hedwig Schwarz

In the doorpost of her house, a hollow
where the mezuzah used to hang.
I press my hand against the indentation,
my way of speaking to the past.

Touch the hollow where the mezuzah
used to hang.  In Horb, Nazis renamed her street
Hitlerstrasse.  My way of speaking to the past
is to listen, press the old men for answers.

1941, Jews were packed into Hitlerstrasse.
Now it’s a winding picture postcard road,
Jew-free, pleasant as it seemed
before Nazis pressed my family into Judenhausen.

I press my hand against the indentation.
Over Horb, a hundred doorposts echo, hollow.

I teach a poetry workshop in SW France for the Virginia Center for the Creative Arts. The moment I stepped out of the car, an elderly neighbor started to talk to me about the Jews who had lived there. That part of France was a hotbed for the Jewish Resistance. Dr. Hirsch, radiologist, was taken my Mengele to work on medical experiments (he testified against Mengele at Nuremburg). His wife Berthe was taken to Auschwitz and gassed; the two children were hidden by the villagers. I met one of them, Nicole Hirsch, who is still traumatized though she’s over 80. We think we know about the Holocaust, but the individual stories still want to be told.

Come Back for Me: A Novel by Sharon Hart-Green

Loss, trauma, memory, and the impenetrable ties of family are the elements that weave together Sharon Hart-Green’s panoramic debut novel Come Back for Me (New Jewish Press). Set in the aftermath of World War II, it is a gripping story about the redemptive power of love and self-understanding.

Come Back for Me tells the story of two young Jewish characters; one is a Hungarian Holocaust survivor Artur Mandelkorn who is on a desperate quest to find his beloved sister, Manya, after they become separated during the war. Artur’s journey takes him to Israel where he falls in love with Fanny, a young woman who still bears the scars of her own tragic past in Germany.

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US Holocaust Museum on Violence against Burma’s Rohingya

United States Holocaust Memorial Museum Statement on the Violence against Burma’s Rohingya Population

The U S Holocaust Memorial Museum is horrified by the ongoing attacks on Rohingya civilians in Rakhine State, western Burma, and calls on the Burmese government to immediately cease its military operations in the region. According to reports, this campaign includes the widespread and systematic targeting of Rohingya with killing, rape, torture, and forced displacement. The Museum reiterates its deep concern about these ongoing mass atrocities, including the risk of genocide.

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Broken on the Inside: The War Never Ended – by Simon Hammelburg

HammelburgBroken on the inside – The War Never Ended by Dutch author and journalist Simon Hammelburg is based on 1200 interviews with Holocaust survivors and their children. The book reads like a novel but is based on facts, some of which have never been revealed before, disclosing insights of the psychological aftermath of survivors as well as the post-war generations and the traumas that are passed on for over six generations.

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