Category Archives: Authors I-Q

ADR Authors by last name I-Q

US Territories and the North Korean threat – by The Rev. Dr. John Pawlikowski

Listening to the national news programs of late as they report on the intensifying threat from North Korea has raised my ire.  Much is made about the future potential of North Korean weapons to hit major population centers of the USA such as Seattle, San Francisco and Los Angles as well as South Korea and its large contingent of American military personnel.  Without question all Americans need  to share this concern.  But mention is rarely, if ever made, of the even greater and current threat to the Pacific regions of Hawaii, Guam, the Commonwealth of the Northern Marianas and American Samoa.  Parts of Alaska also fall into this category.  To me it seems that we value the lives of those Americans less than those of us living on the U.S. mainland.  We have little sense as a nation of the apprehension currently felt  over the North Korean threat by our fellow citizens in places such as Guam.

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Talking About Race, Sometimes Awkward But Always Necessary – by Simma Lieberman

Talking about race with people who are different from you can be awkward and uncomfortable, but it’s necessary and doable. Racism exists, racial conflict exists, and inequality still exists.

Even some people who work in the diversity and inclusion field stay in their comfort zone, and still almost only interact with people who are like them.

After facilitating conversations about race and other differences for over 25 years using our 3D Process, (Diversity, Difference and Dialogue.) we’ve found what works and what doesn’t. At the end of this newsletter, you’ll find a few of our best practices.

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A Benevolent Midwife – Poem by Tausif Mundrawala 

Born in a small village, amidst the dunes,
not during dawn or dusk but mid afternoon.

Progenitor’s countenance was delighted at a glance,
angels in heaven were rendering the radiant dance.

Stillborn made her mother’s womb a barren field,
seed sown bore fruition after commanding her to yield.

In true terms, since birth she was a survivor,
laden with entire kin’s load made her a coherent driver.

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Five Diversity and Inclusion Moves to Make Now – by Simma Lieberman

or… Why There is No Room for Naysayers and Negative Viber

A long-term client recently called me worried that Diversity and Inclusion would be put on the business back burner. “What will happen to support for Diversity and Inclusion now that Trump is president,” he asked.

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Interfaith Panel in the South: A Community Responds – By Gay Morgan Moore

In a time when racial, political, economic and religious divisions in the United States are increasingly obvious, the people of one southern city, Chattanooga, Tennessee, are attempting, through dialogue, to understand the religious beliefs of one another. On a chilly November Monday evening a group of over fifty people gathered at a Hindu temple for the Sixth Interfaith Panel Discussion. The attendees and panelists were ordinary people, with extra-ordinary beliefs concerning the value of gaining knowledge and understanding of the faith traditions of one another.

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My Contra-cultural Marriage and Religious Chaos — by Micki Pelusi

It’s 1959. I’m a Southern religious teenage girl raised on the fire and brimstone of the Baptist Church. My boyfriend is a second generation Italian Catholic. My mother, recently divorced from my step-father, transforms from a “Betty Crocker’ housewife into a bird set free from a gilded cage.  This turn of events leads to her elopement with one of her many men friends to Elkton, Maryland. Butch and I go along as witnesses. After spending the night in her Buick at the A&P parking lot, waiting for the courthouse to open, we finally walk out of the wide court doors—married—all four of us. Mom and Sal drive off to Florida, I move in with a girlfriend and Butch goes back to his home, as if nothing stupendous happened.

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Welcome to the New World – by Judith Nembhard

Every now and then, a convergence of world events causes us to think more deeply about who we are and where we have been. The current refugee crisis is one such confluence of occurrences that have caught the attention of individuals worldwide.  In the midst of the scramble of countries to make appropriate adjustments in their national lives to accommodate an influx of newcomers, many individuals are trying to do something to ease the refugees’ discomfort.

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Sweet Sixteen & Craniofacial Acceptance Month – by Philip Matthews

As I look back sixteen years, I can’t help but thank God for how much He has done for me. I especially thank God for my parents who decided to keep me, instead of aborting me. To all my family, friends, classmates and church members, thank you for encouraging me when I was down, and spending time with me when I was recovering from my craniofacial surgeries.

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