Category Archives: Gender

Gender differences, women in leadership

STEM Women Make it Count – by Sheila Boyington

‘Make It Count’ Event Commemorates Centennial of Women’s Right to Vote, Highlights Equity and Education

This year of 2020 marked the 100th anniversary of a remarkable shift in the women’s suffrage movement—the ratification of the 19th Amendment in 1920 which ensured a woman’s constitutional right to vote.

“The right of citizens of the United States to vote shall not be denied or abridged by the United States or by any State on account of sex. Congress shall have power to enforce this article by appropriate legislation.”

While the movement for equality continues, women leaders in business and STEM across the United States had much progress to celebrate during the centennial milestone. This momentous ‘Make It Count’ occasion celebrated women’s right to vote and provided space for professionals to discuss ways that spark the interest and confidence in women and girls to vote and run for office as well as to pursue STEM-oriented education and careers, leadership opportunities, and equality in business. Like-minded organizations shared best practices, strategies, and results to drive the advancement of female leaders and gender and diversity parity.

Bethany“Right now there is a lot of divisiveness in our country. We need to unify. We need to come together, as women,” said Bethany Hall-Long, Lieutenant Governor of Delaware and the Honorary National Chair of Million Women Mentors (MWM). The Lieutenant Governor served as the keynote speaker and empowered the group. She also shared her experience as a STEM Woman, herself.

SheilaSheila Boyington, President/CEO of Learning Blade and the National States Chair of Million Women Mentors (MWM) served as the event moderator. STEM Women Panelists were: Valoria Armstrong, Vice President National Government and Regulatory Affairs of American Water; Deb Clary, Corporate Director of Humana; and Lynn Kier, Vice President Corporate Communications of Diebold Nixdorf. Breakout Moderators represented the following organizations: Women in Manufacturing (WIM), Science Olympiad, STEMconnector / Million Women Mentors (MWM), the Women in Engineering program at the Cockrell School of Engineering at the University of Texas at Austin / Texas Girls Collaboration Project, and the Aspirations in Computing program of the National Center for Women & Information Technology (NCWIT).

LynnPanelist Lynn Kier spoke to equality in education, specifically, advising young women to “look at the STEM fields as well because it’s accessible and it’s not what you think it is. It’s not your father’s factory floor, it’s many cool, cool things to study.” Panelists also shared opinions on voting, industry trends on diversity and inclusion, strategies on elevating women to STEM careers, and ways to “make it count” this year.

In response to the panel, a plethora of ideas were provided by event participants in engaging breakout sessions, such as: connecting with schools as a starting point for civic engagement, being willing to mentor and showcase careers in STEM fields, getting girls to pursue STEM early through classes and career exposure in middle and high school, and providing externship or internship opportunities to students so that they can see STEM workplaces in action.

EdieEdie Fraser of Women Business Collaborative (WBC) made a compelling Call to Action, stating “We’ve got to see voting, and political participation, in a movement like we’ve never seen before.” She then challenged attendees to think, “What are we doing—particularly in our own framework—to get our friends, our colleagues… how many people are you reaching?”

Much of this is made possible through the power of mentoring as we move more girls and women toward equality. This ‘Make It Count’ event rekindled the spark for STEM women to do just that—to look within their own frameworks and identify ways they could do more to ensure improvement of diversity, equity, inclusion, parity, and education.

To read even more highlights from this impactful event, visit https://conta.cc/31hYgJt.

To watch the entire virtual event, visit https://youtu.be/g2OG5Zjd7Ns.

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Editor’s Note:
ADR STEM Women Study Guide CLICK HERE

 

A STEM Woman’s Story – by Deborah Levine

Don’t Bother Trying to Fit In

Deborah Levine
ADR Editor-in-Chief Deborah Levine

When my family moved to America from British Bermuda, I was still in elementary school, having completed first form, the equivalent of first grade, at the Bermuda High School (BHS) for Girls. Uniform and uniformed, I marched in step with the other girls, just as my mother had done through her entire schooling at BHS. Yes, I did stand out as the only Jewish girl in the school, or anywhere on the island. But generations of my family were well known on the island, so the singularity was tolerable. Inserted into a New York City suburb, I was delighted to find that this particular oddity was completely irrelevant. For better or worse, I still stuck out and a confidence crisis set in.

Continue reading A STEM Woman’s Story – by Deborah Levine

Mother’s Day for a True Diversity Futurist – by Sridhar Rangaswamy

Happy Mother’s Day! Celebrated across the world for this year on May 10, 2020.  During the COVID-19 period, it is a time when people are doing social distancing and this is the time through online, to facilitate, help, support, be fair and objective for mothers across the world.

DEBORAH LEVINEI should state in this time, I had come across a Great Person, Mrs. Deborah Levine, whom I wanted to share and support as a true mother having all the above qualities.

She is a giver and she takes time to do so always promptly, in spite of her busiest schedule on earth-managing multiple things at this time period. It’s not easy, and I respect her fully, support her as a generous, compassionate, humanitarian. She is true being human compared to being born as a human…there is a difference in practice in action and deeds as a true/fellow brotherly/sisterly hood.  Continue reading Mother’s Day for a True Diversity Futurist – by Sridhar Rangaswamy

Why Bother Writing? – by Deborah Levine

Step Up Writing Skills
Climb Up the Ladder

Why bother writing when technology does much of the work for us? Templates plan for us, spell-check edits for us, and there’s enough information online to produce a ocean of plagiarized work. It’s no surprise that technical and business writing skills are becoming lost arts. Yet, successful communication with colleagues, teams, and clients relies heavily on written memos, emails, reports, proposals, and evaluations. Professional development , especially in Science, Technology, Engineering and Math (STEM) should have a strong focus on technical writing skills, but rarely does.

technical writing

If you want to lead in STEM…

  • Write to organize your thoughts
  • Write to increase your visibility
  • Write to develop your credibility
  • Write to establish your influence

Continue reading Why Bother Writing? – by Deborah Levine

Inclusive Sports – by Martin Start

Diversity in the Sports World

Sport plays a significant role in creating communities as common bond is formed when individuals and teams compete celebrating their successes and failures with others.  The Olympics is as much a peace movement as a sporting event with the Olympic flame a symbol of harmony, cultural plurality and togetherness. Athletes have been practitioners of Inclusion & Diversity (I&D) for decades meeting and connecting with people from other countries and backgrounds setting aside differences and developing a sense of fair play for all. Nicknamed “The Greatest”, Muhammad Ali is one of the most celebrated sporting figures of the 20th Century and he brought the whole world together when an estimated global audience of 1 billion viewers watched his famous “The Rumble in the Jungle” fight with George Foreman. In the 21st Century, major sporting apparel companies understand the ubiquitous commercial benefits of I&D as evidenced in the World Economic Forum article titled: The business case for diversity in the workplace is now overwhelming which stated:

     “It is important for corporations to step up and advocate for diversity and tolerance on a public platform. A great example of this is Nike’s support of American football quarterback and rights campaigner Colin ` Kaerpenick. More than a marketing exercise, it showed the world that one of America’s best-known corporations was willing to stand aside one man in his battel against racial injustice and intolerance.”

Continue reading Inclusive Sports – by Martin Start

Women’s History Month Tribute to the Queen of Soul – by Elwood Watson

of soul
Aretha Franklin

During Women’s History Month we pause to remember and celebrate the achievements of iconic women who positively contributed to shaping the social fabric of America.

One such woman is the spectacular singer, Aretha Franklin. She is still affectionately known as the “Queen of Soul” to her countless millions of fans and others worldwide who span generations of every race, color, gender, age and ethnicity.

Continue reading Women’s History Month Tribute to the Queen of Soul – by Elwood Watson

Corporate Women in Tech Part 2 – by Tamara Backovic

in techHow Dominant Is Bro Culture in Tech?

Whether we like it or not, it is clear that gender equality in the tech world is still a dream, not a reality. When it comes to women in tech statistics, they show a drastic gender gap. 

For instance, women hold only 24% of jobs in the tech field.

Nonetheless, the situation seems to be improving in the recent period. The likes of Indra Nooyi or Ginni Rometty are leading by example. These women can act like the lighthouses, which we all need to help us enter a better future.

So, how does the “bro culture” affect the position of women in the modern tech industry? To answer this question, we will need to dig deeper into the corporate world. Thus, let’s not waste any more time and start looking for clues and relevant information.

Continue reading Corporate Women in Tech Part 2 – by Tamara Backovic

Corporate Women in Tech Part 1 – by Tamara Backovic

in techIs Moving up the Corporate Ladder in Heels Mission Impossible?

In the recent period, impactful campaigns, such as #MeToo, have once again drawn attention to the issue of gender inequality. More precisely, the position of women in modern society has been discussed and dissected.

Even so, the statistics on women in tech show that women hold only 20% of all job positions in the industry.  Marginalization, in this case, is an understatement!

So, how can women overcome gender bias and climb the corporate ladder? Is 2020 the year to put an end to those patterns of behavior that discriminate against women and their accomplishments? Let’s find out.

Continue reading Corporate Women in Tech Part 1 – by Tamara Backovic

Remembering: A Woman’s Life Well-Lived – by Judy Kimeldorf

Reflecting at 80

Judy Kimeldorf was born in 1940 and witnessed or participated in world-changing events from the erection of the Berlin Wall to Martin Luther King’s “I have a dream” speech, and now the disappointing step back into nationalism and fascism. She spends her time in retirement on community projects including Food Banks, monthly standing out with Trump-GOP protest placards programs, coordinating a program providing back-to-school supplies for limited income families, and guiding her local home owners association. I (her husband of 40+ years) invited 50 of her close friends to celebrate her 80th birthday. Judy and I celebrate  birthdays by remembering and reflecting, and this year, Judy recalled experiences shaping her life across 80 years. This piece is built from that speech and contains lessons for us all about balancing our fears and disappointments with our hopes and blessings.
~
Martin Kimeldorf

Continue reading Remembering: A Woman’s Life Well-Lived – by Judy Kimeldorf