Category Archives: Authors R-Z

ADR authors listed by last name R-Z

Interview #1: How to Grow as an Entrepreneur – by Fatima Williams

You have an idea, you have something that you want to do, a business that you want to start up. How do you go about doing it?’
Self-Confidence, Motivation, and Inspiration help you develop and grow as an Entrepreneur. It’s about recognizing opportunity, looking around you, and thinking of something that could be done differently. It might be a new product or a new service but it’s about spotting an opportunity in the marketplace. Something out of the box. Out of the ordinary. Often, it’s the most simplest of ideas that really take off.

Inspired by the response to my article, 2018 Challenges for Women Entrepreneurs and How to Overcome Them, I initiated this series called How to grow as an entrepreneur. I am talking to leading and inspiring women entrepreneurs all over the world and welcome men who support Women Entrepreneurship as well. This is about raising awareness. Women need to take the entrepreneur baton in their hands.

LAURA STALEY is the 1st entrepreneur in the series. Laura is Founder of Cherish Your World and she passionately helps people thrive. She started her entrepreneur journey in 2004 after a flood in her finished basement. A realization that she could live with belongings she loves and not hand-me-down stuff she didn’t need.
A purpose driven entrepreneur who empowers people and a mother of a loving son and daughter. Laura has graciously agreed to be part of this series, “I’m happy to be of love and service to other women entrepreneurs!”

Here are Laura’s answers questions about her journey to help people thrive.
1.Do you agree the baton has to be passed on and why?
Yes, the baton needs to be passed on because each person has an opportunity to live true to their deepest calling and purpose. Each of us has unique gifts, talents, life experiences that when shared can bring value to the lives of others. We are meant to shine brightly in the world. Some may choose the path of becoming an entrepreneur. I honor all the different choices people make and it can be exciting and nerve-racking to actually listen to your heart, intuition, and soul.
2.What advice would you give women who want to become entrepreneurs?
Do what you love, live true to your gifts and talents. Listen to your heart because the heart knows the answers. Identify what you love so much that you will jump out of bed every morning excited for the day and all the challenges. What is that “dream that will need all the love you can give everyday of your life for as long as you live?”-Rogers and Hammerstein  What is that dream? Keep going, responding, and making lots of mistakes, and be willing to learn and keep taking inspired actions.
Surround yourself with good, wise people who really believe in you and will be supportive and honest with you. Grow deeply in self-awareness.

3. You have an idea, you want a business you want to start up, how do you go about doing it?
My path was truly unique in that I just kept taking inspired actions after my “AHA” moment after the flood of my finished basement.

  • If you have identified a clear passion, a way to serve others, or a product that brings joy and value, take small steps everyday to bring it to life. Share your idea with trusted others. If you need training, get training.
  • Reach out to others for support in the areas that are not your strengths.
  • Be willing to stretch outside your comfort zone and learn. Keep being brave, network, and ask questions. Keep being willing to grow, adapt, and flow. There are many people willing to help and guide…Ask for support!

4. You’ve mentioned quite a few things there what else would women specially need; can you tell us one crucial thing they need to develop as an entrepreneur?
One crucial thing women might need —I think a great deal of self-awareness, emotional intelligence, and unwavering, unstoppable inspiration, determination, and tons of courage. Not everyone may agree with you and some may be threatened by your sense of empowerment and your passion.

5. What about pitching your idea to somebody or getting investors behind you?
I began by excitedly sharing with friends and it grew little by little each week. In 2015 I reached out to many people when I knew I was all in. I networking and sharing my vision for people to create homes they enjoy and lives they love.

6. And what about risk? As an entrepreneur are you the type of person that’s takes risk? How do we tackle these risks?
Most of my life I have learned to take risks and have made choices with which others did not agree.

  • I’ve learned to “brave the wilderness” as Brene Brown states it and muster the courage and tenacity to keep going. I made and will make lots more mistakes, but I’d rather stretch myself into the unknown than live a half-lived life. The words of Brene Brown inspire me to be brave and vulnerable. It’s terrifying at times.
  • Daily meditation, exercise, and focusing on gratitude supports me immensely. I tackle the risks by going for it, adapting, responding, taking full responsibility for my miscues and missteps.
  • Apologizing, working to make it right if I can, and forgiving myself.
  • Holding compassion for myself and others helps a great deal. We are all on different journeys learning different lessons.
  • I also notice there seems to be this blend or flow between strategic planning and intuitive adapting.
  • Know you will fall down, but also know you have the strength and resilience to get back up and keep going – Laura
  • I have found its helpful to ask what’s working and what’s not working and what could be utterly different. My focus is on the client or the participants at a talk and how I can best serve them.
  • What value can I bring to the table? What fresh perspective can I offer? Can I listen more and talk less? Can I ask more questions?
    Most definitely. Will another person breathe easier because I lived or be moved by those stories and experiences? I hope so.

7. One thing that I’ve always noticed about any entrepreneurs or business people that I’ve interacted with is confidence, what your golden advice on keep that light burning.
At times I have struggled with confidence and self-sabotaging behaviors because I didn’t think I was worthy of being here.
I had a metaphorical “flapping umbilical cord” and was searching desperately for belonging, acceptance, and love.
I faked confidence and lived with yearning and terror inside of me.
Years of book reading, personal growth, therapies, transformational/leadership/emotional intelligence workshops all supported a coming home to my own soul, in my bones an experience of belonging to myself.
I’ve lived through many life challenges that have shaped me, but haven’t defined me.
I tap into Maria, the character from The Sound of Music, and “I Have Confidence” and the song “Titanium” to keep the light burning in the realm of confidence. I’ve lost many people to death and almost lost my son twice. I work to keep it all in perspective. My son now thrives, and I am so grateful.

8. Thank you, Laura, for sharing those personal challenges as well. I admire your Courage. Last question here, please tell us one book, movie or role model who changed the way you looked at things in life.
Maria from The Sound of Music will forever be my role model for exuberance, unwavering passion, determination, ingenuity, courage, and vulnerability. This movie continues to inspire my own life journey. I found my passion and sacred livelihood for a lifetime after reading Terah Kathyn Collin’s book, The Western Guide to Feng Shui. This body of wisdom continues to transform my life. I’m forever grateful.

Thank you, Laura, for being you, please continue to empower and inspire women to take the baton!
Once you believe in yourself and what you’re putting forward to the world, people will believe in you.
We can all form support groups to help each other shine. Are you ready to pass the baton?

2018 Challenges for Women Entrepreneurs and How to Overcome Them – by Fatima Williams

Women Entrepreneurs around the world face major challenges but many are inspiring us to shape the future of global business. They show the value of extending a helping hand to others. They support fellow women to rise together rather than looking at them as rivals. They are instrumental in building positivity and in establishing the Golden Era of Women Entrepreneurship.

Continue reading 2018 Challenges for Women Entrepreneurs and How to Overcome Them – by Fatima Williams

Wish for the New Year – Poem by Yvor Stoakley

Another year has come and gone and a new one just begun.
We completed another circuit around our brilliant Sun.
As we reflect on how we fared in 2017,
Let’s also pause to consider what each of our relationships to us mean.

There are people that we value for their wisdom and insight,
And others who will stand by us in any righteous fight.
There are those we know through love, through friendship, and through tears,
And those with whom we work or worship or were classmates through the years.

Continue reading Wish for the New Year – Poem by Yvor Stoakley

Addressing Social Isolation among Men – by Elwood Watson

Despite his material and enviable career success, Don, like many of his mid-20th-century contemporaries and many men today, more than a half a century later, was hampered by a common theme that is prevalent in the lives of many men — a lack of genuine friendships. The old saying that “the more things change, the more they stay the same” rings true in regards to this particular issue.

Men have chosen to become totally consumed with one’s career to the detriment of having any healthy relationships. There have been a number of theories and reasons from experts as to why so many  men have difficulty establishing and maintaining valuable, close relationships with other men. The social awkwardness and a rejection of intimacy with other men are present in fear of being viewed or labeled as gay. Societal mores have historically frowned upon it. Instead, men have chosen to become totally consumed with one’s career to the detriment of having any healthy relationships. Reasons aside, many individuals with the X/Y chromosome have a real deficit in their level of camaraderie with other men.

The undeniable conclusion from many psychologists, psychotherapists, mental health experts as well as testimony from a number of men themselves is that too many men have too few, if any, real male friends.
There has been a plethora of studies providing evidence that men who are largely friendless are living in an unhealthy situation, often resort to alcohol, engage in drug use, suffer from depression, and should reexamine their current predicament. Some things to consider:
Continue reading Addressing Social Isolation among Men – by Elwood Watson

Unplugged, Under Water, or Buried – by Yvor Stoakley

How Should We Think About the Residents of Barbuda, Florida, Mexico, Puerto Rico, St. Croix, St. Maarten, St. Thomas, and Texas? How should we feel about them?

I live in Wheaton, Illinois, United States of America. The series of natural disasters that have impacted Texas, Mexico, Florida and the Leeward Caribbean islands over the past six weeks have raised some interesting questions about how we think and feel about other human beings.

Continue reading Unplugged, Under Water, or Buried – by Yvor Stoakley

Coping with a Loved One’s Hearing Loss — by Katie Schwartz

Some of  us have extra-sharp hearing, and others begin to lose their hearing at different times. For the first time in history, 20% of those in their late teens and early 20’s are reporting signs of a hearing loss – a problem that will cause major challenges for commerce and industry. (One cause for this is loud music played through earbuds for too long.)  Presbycusis, hearing loss caused by age,  is another challenge, and often starts in the late 50’s or early 60’s. By age 65, one third of Americans experience this problem. There are simple, practical strategies that can help. Here are three taken from the e-book, “What did you say?”

Continue reading Coping with a Loved One’s Hearing Loss — by Katie Schwartz

Harrity Pledge and D&I Challenge – by Mauricio Velásquez

An Interview with John Harrity, Managing Partner, Harrity & Harrity, LLP

At a recent Association of Legal Administrators, Washington, DC Chapter meeting – John Harrity, Managing Partner and Diversity Partner of Harrity & Harrity was on a panel and presenting his firm’s Diversity and Inclusion Journey.  Harrity and Harrity, LLP is an Intellectual Property Firm boutique based in Fairfax, VA, experiencing high growth.  He explained their commitment to Diversity and Inclusion (D&I) and said, “We believe that the ‘practice of law’ is advanced by a more diverse legal team – with diversity of background, upbringing, education, and perspective comes quality legal innovation.  At Harrity & Harrity, we are committed to The Harrity Rule, a supercharged version of the Rooney Rule that shows our firm’s commitment to D&I is not window dressing or smoke and mirrors.”

Continue reading Harrity Pledge and D&I Challenge – by Mauricio Velásquez

Making Dago and the World A Better Place, One Child at a Time – by Brett Weiss

Most of us think about how we can make the world a better place but we all struggle with just how to do it. The challenge is daunting.  In 2009, I spent about two weeks in the tiny village of Dago, Kenya and came away determined to do what I could to improve the lives of these hard-working, incredibly kind but extremely poor people. I decided I wanted to make the world a better place, one child at a time.

Continue reading Making Dago and the World A Better Place, One Child at a Time – by Brett Weiss

Bill Maher and the N-Word Debate – Elwood Watson

Bill Maher, host of the quasi political/entertainment program HBO Real Time with Bill Maher, recently had renowned Black intellectual and ordained Baptist minister Dr. Michael Eric Dyson and rapper Ice Cube as guests. They discussed the n-word controversy that erupted on the May 31 edition of the program when Maher flippantly referred to himself as a “house nigger” in an interview with Sen. Ben Sasse (R-Nebraska). The senator had been invited to the program to discuss his book on what he sees as the increasing problem on prolonged adolescence occurring in American society. Sasse and Maher agreed on the issue and provided examples and suggestions on how to rectify the problem. Things seemed to be going well up until this exchange transpired between both men:

Maher: Adults dress up for Halloween. They don’t do that in Nebraska?

Sasse: It’s frowned upon. We don’t do that quite as much.

Maher: I gotta get to Nebraska more.

Sasse: You’re welcome. We’d love to have you work in the fields with us.

Maher: Work in the fields? Senator, I’m a house nigger.

Continue reading Bill Maher and the N-Word Debate – Elwood Watson