Category Archives: Authors R-Z

ADR authors listed by last name R-Z

The Pond in Winter – Poem by Ann Thornfield-Long

 

            After Henry David Thoreau

 

The winter of ’19, it rained nearly every day,

water gushed from sky, no windshield wiper

equal to it. A slough swelled in the low spot

of the yard, lapped the steps, like a wolf

 

at the door. It was the wolf supermoon that

reflected off the surface one rare, naked night—

quicksilver eerie and lovely as icy solitude,

consoling, clear. A sorrow-voiced owl cried

 

in the pre-dawn, foreshadowing death,

as owls can. Loss spilled over the wall

of my soul and into the crevices where I hid

my treasures, floated them out of their deep

 

secret places onto the banks from underearth

where bluets and bloodroots drank to the dregs

as I would after I saw the land open its mouth

and swallow my love whole, leaving me to choke

 

on the hemlock of grief. I’ll carry the disfigurement

of this flood, a high-water scar the rest of my days.

Not everything, nor everyone survives. Winter

cannot last forever.

SiberiaCyberHaiku – Poem by George Simons

Silently passing through Fargo…
the indiscriminate Fargo of my mind,
I am cruising up the Lena.
I leave the city limits of my head
for what is…now…here…
flowing once before the windows of my eyes.

Morning, she appears,
changeling today, soft and cloudy
where the river flows.

As the clouds thicken
I become confused and ask,
“Will sunlight return?”

Endless flow of green,
sandy shore, then white birch trees,
life without landmarks.

Then houses, a church,
its onion dome an anchor,
faith in solitude.

I peek at a map,
explore the territory,
mind at home again.

Tell me what I am,
where I am, I have forgot
Tell me how, how, how…

Soldier’s Wife – Poem by Wesley Sims

She’d stopped counting the weeks and months
the stingy calendar doled out. Diminished
by tears, her anguish had dimmed some,
feelings that had raged like rain-swelled rapids,
about how he enlisted, leaving her and children
like orphans. Recruiters had pumped him
with speeches and patriotic songs, pretty
girls and liquor. But he would learn, verse

by daily verse, the gospel of war she’d taken
on testimony and faith—that war makes
a terrible mistress, tempting men with glory
and glamour, but feeding them empty bellies,
weary bones, bloody memories and mangled
bodies, and if fate chose them, a ticket home
with traumatized minds or missing limbs.

Continue reading Soldier’s Wife – Poem by Wesley Sims

How to Balance Your Day as a Mom and an Entrepreneur – by Rae Steinbach

Starting your own business is hard work. It’s even harder when you’re a mother. Finding the time to grow your business while also raising children is an intimidating task. If you’re looking to generate a business plan that focuses on coworking ideas, an on-demand product, or simply selling products over the internet, it may seem like you simply don’t have the time when you’re also focused on raising your children.
However, it’s certainly not impossible. Many women in your situation have gone on to become successful entrepreneurs. They simply knew how to manage their time effectively.
These tips will help you do the same. If you’re trying to balance the responsibilities of being a mom and a business owner, keep them in mind.

Continue reading How to Balance Your Day as a Mom and an Entrepreneur – by Rae Steinbach

Asians Celebrate the New Year – by Dr. Julia Wai-Yin So

The first day of the year in the lunar calendar is to many Chinese, Koreans, and Vietnamese who live outside their home countries, the most important festival of the year that they celebrate.  Other Asian ethnic groups may join the festivity in their neighborhoods even though they observe their owe New Year days.  For example, the Thais honor their Songkran (Water Festival) in April or the Gujaratis celebrate theirs the day before the Asian Indian Diwali (the Festival of Lights) in late October or early November.  As for the Japanese and Filipinos, they choose to observe the Gregorian New Year.  With this festive day around the corner, let’s look at some of the New Year traditions of Chinese, Koreans, and Vietnamese.

Continue reading Asians Celebrate the New Year – by Dr. Julia Wai-Yin So

Life Cycle Flexibility – Disrupting the Trajectory of Work – by Paul Rupert

Society is demanding that companies, both public and private, serve a social purpose. To prosper over time, every company must not only deliver financial performance, but also show how it makes a positive contribution to society. Companies must benefit all of their stakeholders, including shareholders, employees, customers, and the communities in which they operate.”
–Larry Fink, CEO, $6 Trillion BlackRock investment manager in his 2018 advisory letter

Mr. Fink’s extraordinary, yet seemingly common sense conclusion is that we need to consider caring not only for shareholders but also for stakeholders, especially employees. But is that a likely shift?

Continue reading Life Cycle Flexibility – Disrupting the Trajectory of Work – by Paul Rupert

Wish for the New Year – Poem by Yvor Stoakley

Another year has come and gone and a new one just begun.
We completed another circuit around our brilliant Sun.
As we reflect on how we fared this year,
Let’s also pause to consider what each of our relationships to us mean.

There are people that we value for their wisdom and insight,
And others who will stand by us in any righteous fight.
There are those we know through love, through friendship, and through tears,
And those with whom we work or worship or were classmates through the years.

Continue reading Wish for the New Year – Poem by Yvor Stoakley