Category Archives: Authors A-H

Authors listed by last name A-H

I have always loved – by Patricia Hope

Long summer evenings
Weekend mornings
The blue of the sky unmarred by a single cloud
Blooming pear trees
Pink dogwoods
Easter sunrise
The second snowfall of the year, when you’d collect bowlfuls to make snow cream
Peach cobbler
Strawberry shortcake
Vanilla fudge
Rice pudding
Making mashed potatoes
Robin Williams and Harrison Ford movies
Captain James T. Kirk guiding the Enterprise through space
Etta James and Sam Cook
Patsy Cline’s “Crazy”
The Carpenters
“Unchained Melody”
Seventies music
Musicals
Singing Christmas carols for shut-ins
Reading Taps for Private Tussie and Watch for a Tall White Sail
Taking nature photographs
Shooting pool
Bangle bracelets
Porcelain plates
Hand-stitched quilt squares
Purple sweatshirts
White wedding gowns
My brother’s humor
My mother’s skin
A baby’s giggles
Walks with my dog Roxie
Sharing poems with wonderful friends

Image credit: Photography of a coneflower with a bee is by Patricia Hope.

Disembodied – by Jonel Abellanosa

After The Night Cafe, by Vincent Van Gogh

Night is our only refuge, when bigotry,
racism and intolerance are asleep.
Hate has been stalking us who aren’t
like most people – by birth or by choice.
We find sanctuary in a place where there’s
no need to speak out.

The doctor would stand next
to the billiard table, one hand in his
lab coat’s pocket, reminding us to be
unhesitant in returning for refills.

First time I see the couple
near the doorway – lady with brown
shawl looking stunned by the spoon
she’s bending without touch,
gentleman with a hat and Anton
LaVey’s eyes. The schizoid is
here, nuns disguised as men staring
at the doll on their table. I’m both
in my room and here to dry up
and cry, invisible.

Image credit: Vincent van Gogh painted ‘The Night Café’ (original French title: Le Café de nuit) in Arles in September 1888), courtesy of https://www.vincentvangogh.org/

A perfect stranger – by Terry Howard

Terry Howard
Terry Howard

I drove through town on the way to, I forget where, when I observed scores of places of worship of varying sizes – megacomplexes to storefronts – doting the landscape. Along the way, I wondered what it was like inside each of the ones I never sat foot in; how their services are conducted, and would I be welcomed in them.

Now when I reached my destination – ah, now I remember, a newly-opened bookstore – and browsed the shelves, I came across an eye-catching book, “How to Become a Perfect Stranger- The Essential Religious Etiquette Handbook.” So, just like that my “prayers” were answered.

Continue reading A perfect stranger – by Terry Howard

Black History Month: Keepin’ It Real on Race – by David B. Grinberg

James Baldwin, the 20th century black intellectual, renaissance author and cultural critic, once observed: “History is the present. We carry our history with us. To think otherwise is criminal.”

In addition to recognizing African American trailblazers of centuries past during Black History Month, it’s also instructive to consider more recent history. That’s why a compelling new book by historian Elwood David Watson, Ph.D. is recommended reading:
Keepin’ It Real: Essays on Race in Contemporary America (University of Chicago Press).

Continue reading Black History Month: Keepin’ It Real on Race – by David B. Grinberg

Beware of Cupid’s Arrow at Work – by David B. Grinberg

While office dating can send you to the honeymoon suite, it’s more likely to land you in the heartbreak hotel, outside on the company doorstep, or in a red hot legal mess.

Whether you’re shooting Cupid’s Arrow or being struck by it, workplace romance can have a detrimental impact on your career. Office dating can damage your prospects for advancement, negatively impact your health and wellness, while causing your productivity to plummet.

Continue reading Beware of Cupid’s Arrow at Work – by David B. Grinberg

Consider the hourglass – by Terry Howard

Terry Howard
Terry Howard

Hey readers, this narrative is for you personally. Each of you.

But before reading further, picture an hourglass and imagine you seated in the top. If not you, envision someone else you know and care about sitting there. And although this may be a stretch, visualize your city of residence, perhaps one that’s splintering along racial lines. Now further picture the sand beneath you slowly slipping into the bottom.

Hold your image for now. hourglass

Continue reading Consider the hourglass – by Terry Howard

Diversity and Speech Part 10: Harmful Speech 2070 – by Carlos E. Cortés

This is the second of three columns in which I make fifty-year projections concerning the following question: as a nation, where will we stand in 2070 when it comes to the contested interplay of diversity and speech?  These three columns are based on a public presentation on diversity and speech that I gave at the December, 2019, Speculative Futures in Education Conference at the University of California, Riverside.

In my previous column I argued that the internet has dramatically altered the diversity-speech discussion, particularly when it comes to hate speech.  As an easily-accessible mechanism for spreading hate, including through troll storms and doxing, the internet has developed into a true weapon of terror.   

Continue reading Diversity and Speech Part 10: Harmful Speech 2070 – by Carlos E. Cortés

MLK Day: Civil Rights Lessons for Millennials and Gen Z – by David Grinberg

David Grinberg
David B. Grinberg

On Monday the nation will pause to observe the annual holiday honoring the life and legacy of iconic civil rights leader, Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Yet too many Millennials and members of their younger cohort, Generation Z, consider civil rights history as ancient history at the dawn of a new millennium.

However, there are profound and poignant lessons which today’s young people need to learn. The most important lesson is how to make major changes in society through the type of peaceful means championed by the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. and his fellow civil rights leaders of the time.

A term of significance for young people to comprehend is: “civil disobedience.”

Continue reading MLK Day: Civil Rights Lessons for Millennials and Gen Z – by David Grinberg

Talking about Race in 2020 – by Mike Green

Then and Now

From 1868 (and a 14th amendment that gave birth to black “Americans”) to 1968 (which saw the brutal murder of a black Christian preacher whose elevated voice of the oppressed was silenced), 100 years of segregationist policies and practices protected and preserved white supremacy and oppressed nonwhites. 

Those policies & practices didn’t die with the reverend Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. They remain in place today, more than 50 years later, in every city in America.

Continue reading Talking about Race in 2020 – by Mike Green

Future Digital Workplace and Job Skills – by Frank Feather

Technological revolutions always transform the workplace, especially the job skills and talents required to perform.

By 2025, about 40% of today’s skills will at least change, if not be made obsolete and replaced by new skills. On average, in some 60% of jobs, at least a 30% of their activities can be automated.

Hence, most jobs will change or be replaced, and more people will need to work alongside technology. Digital technology also changes how and where work takes place.

Digital Workplace Revolution

In the broadest sense, we are moving from a centralized to a decentralized workplace system.

  1. Old Centralized Workplace:
  • The Industrial Revolution moved work from the farm into centralized factories of mass production, starting with textiles and then spreading to other products.
  • The Services Revolution, based on computers and information processing, simply copied the centralization model and moved work into what I call “paper-shuffling factories in the sky.”
  • The Digital Revolution changes all of that again. Things get digitized and decentralized.
  1. New Decentralized Workplace:

In the digital era, most things, if not everything, get reversed. You don’t need to “go” places:

  • You do not need to go to the library; search engines bring the information to you.
  • You do not need to go to shops; online shopping networks place the products on your screen and bring them to your doorstep.
  • So it is with work. The vast majority of office workers (I would say 80% at least) do not need to go to office towers to do their work. Work comes to them.

The digital revolution brings the work to their laptop or other device, anyplace, anytime. So much of today’s service sector work will become decentralized to telecommuting remote workers. This is a slow process that has been ongoing for some time, because traditional managers don’t know how to manage remote workers. But it is expanding rapidly in developed economies.

Digital Skills Revolution

These workplace changes require new skills. The 3 main talents needed are as follows:

  1. “High-Tech” Intelligence

This refers to the ability to transform data into business and customer value. It requires the ability to evaluate information credibility and how it should be used.

Digital technology will be commonplace in every workplace, from farm to factory to the service sector: retail, education, healthcare, travel, entertainment, and professional services.

Employees need skills to work with advanced tech, from Artificial Intelligence (AI) to Robots of every kind. They need to become tech-savvy about AI and how Machine Learning (ML) and Deep Learning (DL) will help them to be much more productive on their jobs and to deliver superior value to customers.

2. “High-Touch” Intelligence

The more the world becomes high-tech, the more it needs to be high-touch, or human. Employees need to know their own emotions and those of others, to foster a team-based, human workplace culture.

The world also is increasingly a “global village,” and organizations are increasingly diverse. As part of high-touch or emotional intelligence (EQ in addition to IQ), employees need to respect and embrace diversity and work together to eliminate every form of discrimination: ethnicity, gender, age, language, religious and political beliefs.

Customers also comprise the global village and they increasingly expect all of this to be reflected in organizations.

3. Self-Management Skill

Collaborative teamwork and interpersonal skills are essential to help organizations achieve their goals and boost customer satisfaction. Due to fast-evolving tech changes, people must commit to adapt to change and to learn necessary new or updated skills as an ongoing process.

Management skills of various kinds will be increasingly important for all employees, not just senior executives. People need good time management skills, self-motivation, continuous re-skilling, sustained creativity and innovation, team project skills, and discretionary decision-making abilities.

As well of course, self-management is very important for any kind of remote work.

Conclusion

The above trends will continue to evolve through the 2020 decade and beyond. And technology will impact every job in every profession, not just those covered here in general terms.

The key is to anticipate and prepare for change, and re-skill or up-skill yourself so that you are not caught out by it.

Remember, the future belongs to those who get there first!