Tag Archives: of women

Interview #1: How to Grow as an Entrepreneur – by Fatima Williams

You have an idea, you have something that you want to do, a business that you want to start up. How do you go about doing it?’
Self-Confidence, Motivation, and Inspiration help you develop and grow as an Entrepreneur. It’s about recognizing opportunity, looking around you, and thinking of something that could be done differently. It might be a new product or a new service but it’s about spotting an opportunity in the marketplace. Something out of the box. Out of the ordinary. Often, it’s the most simplest of ideas that really take off.

Inspired by the response to my article, 2018 Challenges for Women Entrepreneurs and How to Overcome Them, I initiated this series called How to grow as an entrepreneur. I am talking to leading and inspiring women entrepreneurs all over the world and welcome men who support Women Entrepreneurship as well. This is about raising awareness. Women need to take the entrepreneur baton in their hands.

LAURA STALEY is the 1st entrepreneur in the series. Laura is Founder of Cherish Your World and she passionately helps people thrive. She started her entrepreneur journey in 2004 after a flood in her finished basement. A realization that she could live with belongings she loves and not hand-me-down stuff she didn’t need.
A purpose driven entrepreneur who empowers people and a mother of a loving son and daughter. Laura has graciously agreed to be part of this series, “I’m happy to be of love and service to other women entrepreneurs!”

Here are Laura’s answers questions about her journey to help people thrive.
1.Do you agree the baton has to be passed on and why?
Yes, the baton needs to be passed on because each person has an opportunity to live true to their deepest calling and purpose. Each of us has unique gifts, talents, life experiences that when shared can bring value to the lives of others. We are meant to shine brightly in the world. Some may choose the path of becoming an entrepreneur. I honor all the different choices people make and it can be exciting and nerve-racking to actually listen to your heart, intuition, and soul.
2.What advice would you give women who want to become entrepreneurs?
Do what you love, live true to your gifts and talents. Listen to your heart because the heart knows the answers. Identify what you love so much that you will jump out of bed every morning excited for the day and all the challenges. What is that “dream that will need all the love you can give everyday of your life for as long as you live?”-Rogers and Hammerstein  What is that dream? Keep going, responding, and making lots of mistakes, and be willing to learn and keep taking inspired actions.
Surround yourself with good, wise people who really believe in you and will be supportive and honest with you. Grow deeply in self-awareness.

3. You have an idea, you want a business you want to start up, how do you go about doing it?
My path was truly unique in that I just kept taking inspired actions after my “AHA” moment after the flood of my finished basement.

  • If you have identified a clear passion, a way to serve others, or a product that brings joy and value, take small steps everyday to bring it to life. Share your idea with trusted others. If you need training, get training.
  • Reach out to others for support in the areas that are not your strengths.
  • Be willing to stretch outside your comfort zone and learn. Keep being brave, network, and ask questions. Keep being willing to grow, adapt, and flow. There are many people willing to help and guide…Ask for support!

4. You’ve mentioned quite a few things there what else would women specially need; can you tell us one crucial thing they need to develop as an entrepreneur?
One crucial thing women might need —I think a great deal of self-awareness, emotional intelligence, and unwavering, unstoppable inspiration, determination, and tons of courage. Not everyone may agree with you and some may be threatened by your sense of empowerment and your passion.

5. What about pitching your idea to somebody or getting investors behind you?
I began by excitedly sharing with friends and it grew little by little each week. In 2015 I reached out to many people when I knew I was all in. I networking and sharing my vision for people to create homes they enjoy and lives they love.

6. And what about risk? As an entrepreneur are you the type of person that’s takes risk? How do we tackle these risks?
Most of my life I have learned to take risks and have made choices with which others did not agree.

  • I’ve learned to “brave the wilderness” as Brene Brown states it and muster the courage and tenacity to keep going. I made and will make lots more mistakes, but I’d rather stretch myself into the unknown than live a half-lived life. The words of Brene Brown inspire me to be brave and vulnerable. It’s terrifying at times.
  • Daily meditation, exercise, and focusing on gratitude supports me immensely. I tackle the risks by going for it, adapting, responding, taking full responsibility for my miscues and missteps.
  • Apologizing, working to make it right if I can, and forgiving myself.
  • Holding compassion for myself and others helps a great deal. We are all on different journeys learning different lessons.
  • I also notice there seems to be this blend or flow between strategic planning and intuitive adapting.
  • Know you will fall down, but also know you have the strength and resilience to get back up and keep going – Laura
  • I have found its helpful to ask what’s working and what’s not working and what could be utterly different. My focus is on the client or the participants at a talk and how I can best serve them.
  • What value can I bring to the table? What fresh perspective can I offer? Can I listen more and talk less? Can I ask more questions?
    Most definitely. Will another person breathe easier because I lived or be moved by those stories and experiences? I hope so.

7. One thing that I’ve always noticed about any entrepreneurs or business people that I’ve interacted with is confidence, what your golden advice on keep that light burning.
At times I have struggled with confidence and self-sabotaging behaviors because I didn’t think I was worthy of being here.
I had a metaphorical “flapping umbilical cord” and was searching desperately for belonging, acceptance, and love.
I faked confidence and lived with yearning and terror inside of me.
Years of book reading, personal growth, therapies, transformational/leadership/emotional intelligence workshops all supported a coming home to my own soul, in my bones an experience of belonging to myself.
I’ve lived through many life challenges that have shaped me, but haven’t defined me.
I tap into Maria, the character from The Sound of Music, and “I Have Confidence” and the song “Titanium” to keep the light burning in the realm of confidence. I’ve lost many people to death and almost lost my son twice. I work to keep it all in perspective. My son now thrives, and I am so grateful.

8. Thank you, Laura, for sharing those personal challenges as well. I admire your Courage. Last question here, please tell us one book, movie or role model who changed the way you looked at things in life.
Maria from The Sound of Music will forever be my role model for exuberance, unwavering passion, determination, ingenuity, courage, and vulnerability. This movie continues to inspire my own life journey. I found my passion and sacred livelihood for a lifetime after reading Terah Kathyn Collin’s book, The Western Guide to Feng Shui. This body of wisdom continues to transform my life. I’m forever grateful.

Thank you, Laura, for being you, please continue to empower and inspire women to take the baton!
Once you believe in yourself and what you’re putting forward to the world, people will believe in you.
We can all form support groups to help each other shine. Are you ready to pass the baton?

2018 Wellness Resolutions for Mature Women – by Deborah Levine

As part of my New Year’s resolution for better health, I enrolled in MBSR (Mindfulness-based Stress Reduction) course at Chattanooga’s Mindfulness Center. One of the items on my mindful To Do list was to attend a wellness panel co-hosted by Chattanooga’s Jewish Federation and Hadassah, a women’s organization with decades of involvement in healthcare of Israelis and Palestinians and who’s hospital in Israel saved my life years ago.

The panel’s focus was on self-care for a longer, healthier, and more active life for mature women. The panelists included Cady and Ed Jones, the dynamic daughter-father co-owners of Nutrition World, a wellness center providing supplements, yoga, reflexology, acupuncture, and other holistic services. Also on the panel was Nicole Berger, a physical therapist with decades of experience from pediatrics to geriatrics, and Lisa Schubert, an occupational therapist and teacher who specializes in ergonomics.

Continue reading 2018 Wellness Resolutions for Mature Women – by Deborah Levine

2018 Challenges for Women Entrepreneurs and How to Overcome Them – by Fatima Williams

Women Entrepreneurs around the world face major challenges but many are inspiring us to shape the future of global business. They show the value of extending a helping hand to others. They support fellow women to rise together rather than looking at them as rivals. They are instrumental in building positivity and in establishing the Golden Era of Women Entrepreneurship.

Continue reading 2018 Challenges for Women Entrepreneurs and How to Overcome Them – by Fatima Williams

You Are a Woman: Exploring the Mandate – by Lydia Taylor

Think like a woman, talk like a woman, walk like a woman because the mandate is ‘You Are a Woman’.  But how do I accomplish this?
In my previous article, I shared how I heard the words ‘You are a Woman’ during a time of prayer and meditation. In my pursuit of their relevance, I concluded that these words are not simply to confirm gender, but are a mandate urging women to make a difference in their communities and in the world. In that article, the reader is encouraged to discover how they may make an impact that will advance society and elevate those in their individual sphere of influence, whether great or small.

Continue reading You Are a Woman: Exploring the Mandate – by Lydia Taylor

Sheila & Priya Boyington: Women in STEM

Sheila C. Boyington
President, Thinking Media-Learning Blade; National States Chair, Million Women Mentors

Sheila is a successful serial entrepreneur leading the creation of several products. Her company, Thinking Media is the creator of ACT’s KeyTrain® system for WorkKeys® and career readiness (acquired by ACT in 2011), PictureRx® for health literacy, and CharacterEd.Net® for K-12 character education. She is well-known for her passion, strong management, and leadership skills and has been credited for gaining high adoption of the Thinking Media tools including over 30 statewide contracts. Sheila has won numerous awards for her Entrepreneurship and Leadership and as a Professional Engineer.

Priya C. Boyington
Marketing Manager, Stitch Fix

Priya is an e-commerce marketer, passionate about the intersection of retail and technology. She currently resides in San Francisco and is a marketing manager for Stitch Fix’s newly launched men’s business and has previous experience at GoldieBlox, Bain & Company, and Fortune 500 companies. A graduate of Girls Preparatory School (GPS) in Chattanooga, she holds a BS in Industrial and Systems Engineering from Georgia Tech and an MBA from The Wharton School.

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The Art and Civics of Publisher Ruth Holmberg: Making History — by Deborah Levine

Long before The New York Times had its first woman Executive Editor, Ruth Holmberg was the Editor of The Chattanooga Times. Holmberg is a member of the family that founded both newspapers and she has shared her compelling life story as friends and admirers gathered to hear her speak. Holmberg is a former director of The Associated Press and of The New York Times Company, a former president of the Chattanooga Area Chamber of Commerce and of the Southern Newspaper Publisher Association and a member of the Board of Directors of the Public Education Network (PEN). 

The petite, soft-voiced woman is also a member of one of the nation’s most prominent publishing families.

Editor’s note: Publishing icon and Chattanooga civic leader Ruth Holmberg passed away at age 96. In her honor, here is the ADR interview with Ms. Holmberg several years ago.

Continue reading The Art and Civics of Publisher Ruth Holmberg: Making History — by Deborah Levine

The Politics of ‘the angry black Sistah’! – by Terry Howard

Other than race (black) and gender (female), what else do April Ryan, Maxine Waters, Joy Ann Reid and Angela Rye have in common?

The answer? They’re smart as heck, forceful in expressing their politics and views, and more than able to defend themselves against disrespect. You see, while others (yes, men, this also includes many of you too) sit in silence these powerful women won’t hesitate to hit back despite the potential for being tagged “An Angry Black Woman.” (If you’re unfamiliar with these women Google them before reading further.)

Continue reading The Politics of ‘the angry black Sistah’! – by Terry Howard

Lean In History for Women’s History Month – by Deborah Levine

Is women’s history and Women’s History Month still relevant today? Is the need for sisterhood activism over as some say? We look back at the first group to advocate for women’s right to vote nationally and see that it was ultimately successful. The Seneca Falls Woman’s Rights Convention was held long ago in1848. But the words of its organizer Elizabeth Cady Stanton still hold true and yet are still controversial, “We hold these truths to be self-evident: that all men and women are created equal.”

Continue reading Lean In History for Women’s History Month – by Deborah Levine

You Are a Woman, A New Mandate for Today’s Social Climate – by Lydia Taylor

Like many of you, it is my practice to prepare for the day with quiet meditation and prayer. It was during such a time that I heard the words ‘you are a woman’ within my spirit. At the time, I had no idea of the relevance of that statement; but thought its interpretation must be a mystery well beyond female gender. Surely, there must be some deep meaning in those words. After all, they came during a time of meditation and prayer. But what could it be and why were those words given in the late summer of 2016? I had no idea, and tucked the words away in my memory to reflect on them at another time.

Continue reading You Are a Woman, A New Mandate for Today’s Social Climate – by Lydia Taylor