Tag Archives: peace

2020 BOOKS FOR PEACE AWARD 

Deborah Levine  Editor-in-Chief of the American Diversity Report, and her 15 books have been honored with the 2020 International BOOKS FOR PEACE award. The award was born from a project of a group of associations with the aim of enhancing the books (through a literary competition), featuring culture, people, sport, art, dealing with the topics of Peace in the round, not only between peoples, but of peoples: such as gender-based violence, bullying, racial and religious discrimination, social and cultural integration.

Today, in it’s 4th year, the international alliances have expanded to include:

  • IODHR: International Organization for Democracy and Human Rights – Norway
  • INSPAD – Institute of Peace and Development – Pakistan and European Union
  • INTERNATIONAL HUMAN RIGHTS COMMISSION – European Union
  • AFRICAN NGOs DEVELOPMENT NETWORK  – Africa
  • GLOBAL CAMPAIGN TO END CHILD MARRIAGE
  • MY BODY IS MY BODY – United Kingdom and USA
  • FAAVM – Federal association for the Advancement of Visible Minorities – Canada
  • IHRMWORLD – International Human Rights Movement – United Kingdom
  • NHRF – NATIONAL HUMAN RIGHTS AND HUMAN FEDERATION – India
  • FUNVIC – FUNDACAO UNIVERSIDARIA VIDA CRISTA  – Brazil
  • INTERNATIONAL HUMAN RIGHTS ORGANIZATION
  • MUNDIAL DE EDUCACION PARLIAMENT
  • INTERNATIONAL CENTER FOR DIPLOMATIC STUDIES- Norway
  • NAIFA MARUF FOUNDATION – Bangladesh
  • SOCIETY FOR GENDER EQUALITY, EDUCATIONAL, ADVANCEMENT & STRUGGLES – Nigeria
  • INTERNATIONAL ART FOR PEACE FESTIVAL – Iran
  • HUMANITARIAN INITIATIVE CO. LTD – Uganda
  • HOPEWORKS GHANA – Ghana
  • MAHATMA GANDHI GLOBAL PEACE FOUNDATION – India
  • GEORGE WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY OF PEACE – USA
  • PAKISTAN SAFETY COUNCIL – Pakistan

Books for Peace

Sacred Fires: Betty Shabazz, MLK and Thich Nhat Hanh – by Andréana Lefton

Sacred firesOur world is burning up from within. We need action – now – to lower the earth’s temperature, to stop mass incarceration , child abuse, and human trafficking. And what about self-harm and self-hate? Why does our own spirit twist against us so violently?

Searching for more answers – or at least some deeper insights – I turned to the lives of three people burned by hate, and burning with love. The first is Vietnamese monk and peace activist, Thich Nhat Hanh.

Continue reading Sacred Fires: Betty Shabazz, MLK and Thich Nhat Hanh – by Andréana Lefton

For Peace — by Kwaku Amoako Fosu-gyeabour

A thousand mile journey starts with a step
Between whispers of war starts with a tone,
No one will dream of war to receive us with loneliness
When will it stop?
Dreadful scenes, rack-edged sorrows and rapid holocaust
Will this malediction still continue?
We have crossed the river

Continue reading For Peace — by Kwaku Amoako Fosu-gyeabour

Diversity, Dialogue, and Mindsight – by Greg Nees

Have you ever entered a conversation with the best of intentions, only to end up in an argument? I suspect we have all had this experience and I’d like to suggest that one reason this happens so often is because of mind distance. When we try to communicate with people whose experiences and world views are very different from our own, we often run into invisible walls. It’s like trying to describe colors to a friend who has been blind from birth. No matter how much we try to explain what the world looks, sounds, and feels like to us, if the other person’s experiences have been significantly different, they will have trouble listening and understanding. In my work as an interculturalist, I encounter such mind distance on a regular basis.

Continue reading Diversity, Dialogue, and Mindsight – by Greg Nees

Lessons of a Joint Arab-Jewish Kindergarten — by Amir Shlomian of Maayan Babustan/Ein Bustan

For those of you who have not yet heard the story of the Maayan Babustan/Ein Bustan kindergarten, this is a Waldorf school, a kindergarten that is run in two languages – Arabic and Hebrew. The kindergarten is situated in the Arab village of Hilf, within the municipality of Bosmat Tab’un, 7 minutes drive from the nearby Jewish town of Kiryat Tivon. The kindergarten is attended by 27 Arab and Jewish children, in two age groups. The staff is also comprised of Arabs and Jews: in each class there is a Hebrew speaking teacher and an Arabic speaking teacher. In addition, we are pleased to have two interns, two young Bedouin Arab women who are fulfilling their “Year of Service” by working as assistants in the kindergarten, one in each age group.

Continue reading Lessons of a Joint Arab-Jewish Kindergarten — by Amir Shlomian of Maayan Babustan/Ein Bustan